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How does the change in the number of gas particles change the pressure of gas in a glass beaker

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Introduction

Lakichevich, Savva

IB Physics HL 2

September 27, 2012

How does the change in the number of gas particles

change the pressure of gas in a glass beaker

The point of this experiment is to see the dependence of pressure on the change of the number of particles of air. The expected result is a direct proportionality. Gas behavior can be described within the terms of pressure (P), volume (V), number of particles (n) and temperature (T):

image00.png

Where R is the gas constant, and it is equal to 8.31. In order to find the dependence of pressure on the amount of air, we divide both sides by V:

image01.png

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 needs to be controlled so as to determine the dependence only between pressure and the number of particles.

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Middle

Pull out 20 mL of air out of the beaker 5 times, and record the pressure every time air is sucked out of the beaker

Make sure to hold the syringe strongly, as the low pressure in the beaker will pull air back in

Repeat the previous step 5 times

Diagram:

Syringe

Pressure Gage

Beaker

Water

Data:

Below is the table showing all the five trials, including the average results.

...read more.

Conclusion

This is the graph representing the dependence of pressure with respect to the amount of air:

        Conclusion and evaluation

Through this experiment it was concluded that the decrease of amount air leads to a decrease in pressure, just like an increase in the amount of air leads to the increase in pressure, meaning a direct proportionality, just as expected. Some of the mistakes include 18°C water instead of room temperature (20°C), which could have allowed some variation in the data. Other sources of error would include the device itself: it can be clearly seen that the pressure gage is not 100% precise, even though very close to it, which is the reason why there were 5 trials to eliminate that error, or at least minimize its effect.

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