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Physics-investigate the relationship of temperature and the height of the bounce of a squash ball

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Navrachana International School                Shivani Patel

Topic: Kinematics

Title: Bounce of Squash Ball

Date Performed: March 24th 2012

Date of Submission: April 2nd 2012


Aim:

To investigate the relationship of temperature and the height of the bounce of a squash ball

Background:

Before beginning a game of squash, the players usually knock the ball around to warm it in order to improve its bounce. A squash ball is made up of two rubber halves. It contains a specific amount of compressed air. Some of this compressed air is lost when the ball comes in contact with another object (therefore, for the investigation a brand new squash ball should be used). The ball also heats up slightly on impact, and therefore the more times the ball comes in contact with another object with substantial force, the more it heats up. When the temperature of a squash ball increases, the pressure of the air inside the ball will increase according to Boyles Law. (Temperature and Pressure are directly proportional when the Volume is constant) The greater the pressure inside the ball the higher it

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Middle

C, and 60°C.

7. Repeat these steps twice again for accuracy.

8. Watch the recorded videos and find out the heights of the bouncing balls.

9. Record all the data in tables.

Results:

Raw Data:

For 30°C

Attempt

Height (cm)

1

22.1

2

22.3

3

23.2

image00.png

For 35°C

Attempt

Height (cm)

1

27.2

2

26.5

3

25.4

image01.png

For 40°C

Attempt

Height (cm)

1

29.3

2

30.1

3

29.1

image02.png

For 45°C

Attempt

Height (cm)

1

34.7

2

33.4

3

32.5

image03.png

For 50°C

Attempt

Height (cm)

1

38.0

2

37.7

3

37.3

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Conclusion

The data seems to be pretty reliable although one cannot be sure if the squash ball did stay the temperature of the water bath as wanted to carry out the experiment. But to try an make sure that the ball was the temperature of the water bath we left the ball in the water bath for 2 minutes for it to acclimatize once the desired temperature was reached. The height from which the ball was dropped was controlled as the greater the distance from the ground, the greater the bounce. Another factor controlled was the type of squash ball used because different squash balls have different bouncing effects and are made of different materials.

Overall I felt that my results were good and reliable as I tried my best to keep the investigation fair.

Though I feel that the experiment was fair, if it were to be repeated or done on a large scale, I would need to eliminate any inaccuracies of measurement, as there is always human error despite the use of technology (in this experiment).

To further this experiment in the classroom other factors such as the way the ball is dropped, or the height from which it is dropped or the size and shape of the ball could be investigated.

...read more.

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our International Baccalaureate Physics section.

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