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Speed of Sound in Air

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Introduction

Hypothesis The predicted velocity of sound in air is 344 m/s. Eg. v = �? First Resonance: l = 1/4? ? = v/� = 1/4 (1.34375m) = (344 m/s) / (256Hz) = 0.336m =1.344m Second Resonance: l = 3/4? = 3/4 (1.34375m) = 1.008 m Predicted Values of First and Second Resonance for Each Individual Tuning Fork Frequency (Hz) � 0.5 Predicted Length of First Resonance (m � 0.005m) Predicted Length of Second Resonance (m � 0.005m) 256 0.336 1.008 320 0.269 0.806 384 0.224 0.672 440 0.195 0.586 512 0.168 0.504 Variables Manipulated Variable * Tuning Fork Frequency (256 Hz, 320 Hz, 384 Hz, 440 Hz, 512 Hz) Responding Variable * Length of the tube at the first and second resonance Controlled Variables * Room Temperature (20.0�C � 0.05�C) * Air Pressure (100 KPa) * Water Level (0.400m � 0.005m) * Water Temperature (20.0�C � 0.05�C) Procedure 1. ...read more.

Middle

Data Length of the First and Second Resonances for Each Individual Tuning Fork Frequency (Hz) � 0.5 Length of First Resonance (m � 0.005m) Length of Second Resonance (m � 0.005m) 256 0.341 1.003 320 0.264 0.804 384 0.215 0.663 440 0.191 0.576 512 0.164 0.502 v = �? First Resonance: l = 1/4? Second Resonance: l = 3/4? ? = 4 l ? = (4/3) l ? = 4 (0.341m) ? = (4/3) (1.003m) ? = 1.364m ? = 1.337m Wavelength of the First and Second Resonances for Each Individual Tuning Fork Frequency (Hz) � 0.5 Wavelength of First Resonance (m � 0.005m) Wavelength of Second Resonance (m � 0.005m) 256 1.364 1.337 320 1.056 1.072 384 0.860 0.884 440 0.764 0.768 512 0.656 0.669 v = �? First Resonance: v = �? Second Resonance: v = �? v = (256Hz) (1.364m) ? = (256Hz) (1.337m) v = 349.183 m/s v = 342.272 m/s T = 1 / � Average ? ...read more.

Conclusion

Most of the inaccuracies in this experiment should be accounted from the measuring of the l of the first and second resonances. One should also take into consideration that determining of the first and second resonances were done by ear. A final factor that might have played a role in the inaccuracies would be how we measured the length of resonance (the meter stick was moved to match the bottom of the tube to the top of the water surface but the meter stick was not held steadily). A suggestion for improvement would have been to place the meter stick on the ground beside the cylinder of the water and tube and then measure the height of the water (measuring the length of resonance by subtracting the height of water from the height of the tube to minimize inaccuracy). With these errors and suggestions taken into consideration, a repetition of this lab should ensure more accurate results (even though the error was only 0.0119%). ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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