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Social Facilitation Internal Assessment

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Introduction

Social Facilitation Name IB Number Standard Level Psychology Date Word count Table of Contents Abstract.........................................................................................................3 Introduction.....................................................................................................4 Method...........................................................................................................5 Results...........................................................................................................7 Discussion......................................................................................................8 Works Cited....................................................................................................9 Appendix......................................................................................................10 Abstract Studies have shown patterns in which people are more likely to have a better performance when competing against others or when under the eye of others also. This theory, first researched by Norman Triplett in 1898, is called social facilitation. Triplett noticed that bike racers have faster times when racing against others compared to racing alone. He also studied the different performances based on the difficulty of the situation. Social facilitation theories have since changed and have become more developed since Triplett's first conclusions. In my experiment, I aimed to determine if people perform better in groups compared to being alone. I hoped to reach this aim by testing the speed of different people over a certain distance. I first timed them running alone, and then timed them when competing against others. There was a major difference in these times among all participants in this study. All of the people tested seemed to have much faster times when running against other people. Social facilitation is indeed a very accurate theory and my experiment helped me to see that. Introduction Social facilitation is known as the tendency for people to have a better performance when performing simple tasks when under the eye of others or when competing against another, rather than while they are alone,. ...read more.

Middle

Dealing with maturation factors, all of the subjects were studied at the same time and the same place, making sure no others factors would contribute to the differences in the experiment. I was sure to inform all members of the study that they must listen and use our time effectively. I strictly encouraged no messing around and stressed the importance of their focus during the process. To eliminate experimental bias in the study, I was not the only person testing these subjects. I had a couple of friends who were not participating in the study help me to time each participant's running times to make the results more accurate. Materials: In performing the experiment, the only instruments needed were a five stop watches, brand new and precise, and pencil and paper with a previously configured chart. This made the instrumentation concerns very slim because I depended only on one major instrument as a source of information. As there were many concerns in this study, I hope that I did my best to eliminate as many as possible. Participants: My target population was an opportunity sample. The participants of my study were chosen from a group of youth at my church. My youth group, ages twelve to seventeen, volunteered to partake in this testing. ...read more.

Conclusion

I tried very hard to be ethical throughout my experiment by treating the participants with respect and informing them of the process. This helped them to be more cooperative and easy to work with. Another strength I found in my experiment was the method that I chose to collect the needed data. Instead of being the only person timing the speed of each participant, other people helped me to be as accurate as possible. This methodology proved to be successful. On the contrary, my main weakness was that I was limited on the amount of people I could test. Because this procedure could not be conducted in a classroom, I had to find another group of people that would be willing to participate. If I had been able to test a more diverse class, my results could have been more accurate. I know that my results cannot be generalized outside of the opportunity sample because it is a non-representative sample, but I do believe that I came to the right conclusion. If I could do this experiment again, I would have tested the same groups more than once, on different days so that certain factors such as tiredness or hunger of the participants would not contribute to the results. In conclusion, according to the results of my replication of Triplett's experiment based on social facilitation, people perform better in groups compared to being alone. ...read more.

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