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Social identity theory revision notes

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Introduction

1. Evaluate social identity theory Social identity theory: assumption that individuals strive to improve their self-image by trying to enhance their self-esteem based on personal identity or with various social identities 1. By Henri Tajfel 2. People can boost self esteem though personal achievement / affiliation with successful groups 1. Shows the importance of social belonging 2. Social VS Personal Self adapted in different situations 3. SIT based on cognitive process of social categorization 1. Explains social phenomena such as in-group favoritism, stereotyping, and conformity to in-group norms 2. May produce competitive intergroup behavior 3. People who belong to a group (even when assigned) ...read more.

Middle

Evaluation: our need for positive self-concept will result in a bias in these intergroup comparisons, therefore people are more positive to what your group represents Tajfel et al 1971: 1. Aim: whether people that are placed randomly in a group would create a bond 2. Method: assign randomly a bunch of boys [14-15 years old] that did not know each other. The participants were led to believe that they were divided based on their preference for the art of Kandinsky or Klee, and they had to rate their members and then their out-groups 3. Results: out-group was rated as less likeable 4. ...read more.

Conclusion

group theory with social representations Social representations: shared beliefs and explanations held by the society in which we live in or the group which we belong in 1. Social representations are the foundation of social cognition 2. Help us make sense of our world and to master it 3. Enable communication to take place among members of a community 4. providing them with a code for social exchange 5. a code for naming and classifying unambiguously the various aspects of their world and their individual or group history Cultural schemas that are fundamental to the identity of a group Provide common understanding for communication within their group 1. e.g. A group may have their own social representation of success, beauty, or intelligence ...read more.

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