• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Examine the ethical question of Euthanasia in particular examine the way in which language and beliefs are used to justify positions.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Examine the ethical question of Euthanasia in particular examine the way in which language and beliefs are used to justify positions. The three main issues that are discussed the most commonly in today's world are euthanasia, abortion and same sex marriage. In order to examine the ethical question of Euthanasia it is necessary to define the meaning of the word "Euthanasia". The word has its origin in the Greek word "euthanatos"meaning translated in English "good death". It describes the practice of ending someone's life in a painless manner. The term euthanasia names a lot of varying methods. There are possibilities to conduct euthanasia with and without consent (voluntary and involuntary euthanasia). Involuntary Euthanasia is performed where an individual makes the decision to die for another person incapable of doing so. In addition to that there are different ways to conduct euthanasia. Passive euthanasia is the most common and most accepted form. ...read more.

Middle

Also the Orthodox Judaism supports laws against physician assisted suicide. Jews believe that the recognition of a constitutionally recognized right to die for the terminally ill is a clear statement against the recognition and sanctity of human life..."1. We see the examined religions do not support euthanasia and assisted suicide at all. The second opposition is members of the medical associations whose members are dedicated to save and extend life. Euthanasia and assisted suicide would be the exact opposite to their dedication. Furthermore this group is scared that they have to decide whose injuries are too bad to be helped. It might end up with doctors or office workers to decide who is worth the economy costs of a place in hospital. And for them this would not be morally correct. Being concerned with disabilities the third group opposing euthanasia fears that a legalization of euthanasia is the first step to a society that will kill disabled people against their will. ...read more.

Conclusion

The first rhetorical objective I realized used by the pro life fraction is a "slippery slope"3. A "slippery slope" is a rhetorical objective whereby different situations are based on each other but the way they are connected is usually very senseless. Trying to evoke charity the other side's argumentation is based on imagery. They describe the worst case scenario, a case in which euthanasia or assisted suicide appears right to most of the population. The picture of a man or a woman who is not able to do anything anymore, not even to kill his or herself, could possibly evoke pity in most of the people in this population. I think it is not possible to state if euthanasia and assisted suicide are ethical right or not. The fact that we do not know what is happening afterwards we are not able to judge if this is worth to die. 1. http://www.religioustolerance.org/euth2.htm 2. http://www.religioustolerance.org/euth2.htm 3. Structure of a slippery slope: Situation A causes Situation B which causes Situation C which is bad. So we have to prevent situation A in this case the legalization of Euthanasia. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our International Baccalaureate Theory of Knowledge section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related International Baccalaureate Theory of Knowledge essays

  1. Euthanasia . If people express a desire to die peacefully in their old ...

    or moving does not sound like a desirable situation, the decision should be the individuals not some one who does not know what it feels like to slowly lose basic motor skills, or who has no idea what chemotherapy feels like.

  2. What is an abortion?

    They said that a slave was not a human like everyone else. He was only property. Property can be acquired and even destroyed, at the convenience of the owner. In the same way, a slave could be bought, sold, or killed.

  1. Examine the ethical issues in vivisection and discuss the extent to which it should ...

    According to Mill's utilitarianism, vivisection would be considered right because the majority of people benefit and can achieve happiness as a result of the tests. Similarly, scientists push for the concept that it should always be permissible for human beings to protect themselves even at the expense of the suffering

  2. Does the End justify the Means?

    Although lying is not publically acceptable, at times it is considered necessary and even recommended, to lie to other people. Lying has become a common practice in the society of today. It has become so common that people have come up with an excusable type of lie: the 'little white lie'.

  1. TOK: Religious beliefs

    to ignore - and if fundamentalism were to arise, kill people belonging to - other religions. Some religious pluralists seem witless of this fact, by preaching the acceptance of all religions they are actively engaging in building up a nuclear war4; as religious beliefs-at their core- do not believe in the truth of any other religion.

  2. Capital Punishment and why it should be abolished, with particular regard to the Human ...

    This is clearly violated as capital punishment takes away the life and liberty of the sentenced. Article 2 states that Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status.

  1. Some people say that religious beliefs can be neither justified nor refuted by reason. ...

    The confidence and firm persuasion in Jesus' life and deeds are the major premise for all knowledge claims since the Lord says, 'I am the way, the truth, and the life.'6 Not all religions, however, base their doctrines on some unquestionable faith in God.

  2. Discuss the view that we cannot justify absolutist moral rules in a multi cultural ...

    Kant believes that all people process reason and so it is possible for everyone to arrive at an understanding of moral truth independent of experience. An advantage would be that therefore an agent?s duty is always the same, hence universal.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work