• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

On January 3, a convicted felon was given a new heart at Stanford Medical Center. This transplant was paid for by the courtesy of California taxpayers. With this, people found it extremely troubling that a criminal would receive an organ transplant

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Violent Felons Paper On January 3, a convicted felon was given a new heart at Stanford Medical Center. This transplant was paid for by the courtesy of California taxpayers. With this, people found it extremely troubling that a criminal would receive an organ transplant while hundreds of law-abiding citizens who are in need of an organ are forced to wait. This brings up the discussion if the convicted felon should even receive the transplant, as well as medical care at all. Therefore, to what extent can a person's value be determined by their actions? A person's actions may fully express their value, but in this case, receiving an organ transplant should depend on the severity of the actions committed. ...read more.

Middle

Not all people in prison are bad individuals, and not all bad people are in prison. A person could be wrongly convicted of a crime, and never get an opportunity for medical care just because they were imprisoned. It is true that a person's actions influence their value, but even if there actions have not been righteous, that does not mean that they should be denied of their humanity. If prisons were not to provide medical care, every imprisonment could essentially become a death sentence. Ethically speaking, this would seem morally wrong and unjust. Other ethical problems, which exist by not allowing felons to receive a transplant, include that the felon would be stripped of his or her liberty and the necessities of life. ...read more.

Conclusion

Ultimately, a person's actions determine their value, but it depends on what actions and how frequently they have been performed. It also depends on the severity of their actions and their background life. According to this, a convicted felon should be allowed to receive transplants and medical care just as a law-abiding citizen is allowed. Refraining from doing so would be unethical because the felon would be denied of their humanity and stripped of their liberty. In spite of this, law-abiding citizens should always have first priority of transplants and medical care. Since they have not committed anything unjust, they have the right to a first need basis, unlike the felons. Essentially, both persons should be allowed equal transplant and health care benefits due to the necessities of life. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our International Baccalaureate Theory of Knowledge section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related International Baccalaureate Theory of Knowledge essays

  1. Mathematics is at the heart of nature. Discuss.

    every month from the second month on..." The answer was 1,12,3,5,8,13,21,34.... What makes this sequence particularly interesting is the other places it fit in, which include; Fibonacci rectangles, spirals, The Golden Ratio - plant roots, plant petals, seed heads, and even pine cones to name a few, researchers and enthusiasts have found much more.

  2. Knowledge is a true organ of sight

    Our knowledge is being matched with our sight, so that we know what something is. If one of these organs also known as "sources" does not work, or doesn't work properly a faulty image can be created. To prevent a faulty image to be created it is good to depend

  1. The Allegory of New York City

    "Sally's book store, Sally's book store, 23rd June, Sally's book store, 23rd June, 23rd June." Stephen mutters to himself as his sits down again looking extremely pale. Imagine that you had just heard and seen what you thought was your conscience.

  2. Euthanasia . If people express a desire to die peacefully in their old ...

    Economically euthanasia for patients who suffer from terminal cancer with no hope for remission, such as lung cancer, would greatly reduce financial burden to their families, and those on Medicare would free up much needed funds for other patients. People have the right to life liberty and the pursuit of

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work