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Perception. Factors such as a persons educational background, culture, societal norms and expectations, media, physical senses and life experiences create, shape and build the perceptions and filters from which people view the world.

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Introduction

Perception is an empirical enquiry gained through experience, and because of this, there is no single case where one perceives the world in the same way as another person. When a person experiences any sort of event, filters comes into play, which affect the manner in which the experience and corresponding data are processed by a person. Eventually, a person's conscience is also activated and that, combined with what is perceived through the various filters allows the person to act in whatever manner he sees fit. There are many filters which can affect a person's perception and the filters will vary from person to person. There are, however, various filters that are probably common to most of us: a person's educational background, culture, societal norms and expectations, media, physical senses and life experiences. Education is an especially powerful filter. Not only do people have differing levels of education, but any good education will expose a person to various schools of thought and ways of looking at the world, some of which have their origins in the ancient world and others that reflect the most modern and up-to-date approach to looking at the world around us. ...read more.

Middle

Saudi society, for example, is one in which religion and the rest of the culture are intimately linked. Religious law, as set out in the holy book, governs all aspects of life. Those who take a very fundamentalist view have a very narrow filter through which they perceive the world, and as a result are fearful of any outside influence. The same, however, would be equally true of a fundamentalist Christian living in a small secluded town in the United States. The filter can be the same, even though the context is entirely different. Societal strains and burdens on a person can also significantly affect a person's outlook and perception of the world around them. A person constantly trying to appease a higher being, whether it be in the religious context, trying to appease God, or whether it be family, friends or associates, may try to bring his perception of the world into line with that of his religion, family, friends or associates. 'Peer pressure', to which teenagers are particularly prone, is an important filter in most societies. Propaganda, media and advertising within a society can dramatically change a person's way of thinking to bring about a desired outcome. ...read more.

Conclusion

Over time, a person who can understand that there are different perspectives and accept that they are equally valid will come to appreciate the fact that peaceful coexistence requires compromises and that the ability to detect and understand the filters through which others are viewing a particular situation will sometimes help them to reach an acceptable compromise in a much shorter period of time. Factors such as a person's educational background, culture, societal norms and expectations, media, physical senses and life experiences create, shape and build the perceptions and filters from which people view the world. Human nature being what it is, this is likely to always be the case. This, however, is not necessarily a problem, because without the diverse and unique perspectives, interpretations, opinions and ways of expressing oneself, whether through art, literature or music, the world would be a much duller place. The challenge, though, is to be able to get past the filters and different perceptions that people have in order to find a common interest, purpose or need that will encourage people to see things from a more common perspective. Word Count: 1,518 Serene Xefos 1218031 1 ...read more.

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