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That which can be asserted without evidence can be dismissed without evidence. (Christopher Hitchens). Do you agree?

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Introduction

?That which can be asserted without evidence can be dismissed without evidence.? (Christopher Hitchens). Do you agree? The idiom, ?seeing is believing? has been inspiring the human race of how powerful evidence is in shaping our beliefs. Therefore, it is a norm in the human culture that any information must embody explicit evidence before it can only be said as true. The same conception was proposed by Christopher Hitchens as he quoted, ?that which can be asserted without evidence can be dismissed without evidence?. I personally believe that this statement is a false analogy and is rhetorical as it is persuasive in demanding people to perceive in a one-way manner. Knowledge covers various fields and grounds, with each ground constitute different measures in order to validate information as a source of knowledge. In other words, the need of evidence may also differ between areas of knowledge. Hence, to justify my assumption on the statement quoted by Christopher Hitchens, thoughts with consideration of counter-arguments are assembled to address the relevance of evidence in natural science and religion. Living in the millennium century has enabled us to witness numerous scientific discoveries have been made by scientists. From one of the biggest breakthrough in chemistry through the uncovering of the atomic theory by John Dalton to the controversial theory of evolution proposed by Charles Darwin, scientific discoveries has significantly contribute to how we see and perceive the world today. ...read more.

Middle

As I come to think about it, observations in natural science are much influenced by our expectation. Einstein as a reputable scientist is well-respected and his ideas will usually gain attention from the science community as he is highly-regarded as a genius due to his incredible range of theoretical physics publication in the early 1900s. Hence, as we are confident of his findings, we tend to believe that the theory is true without the need of being justified. Clearly, the science community is actually making an ad hominem fallacy. The flaw of natural science through the treatment of double standard shifts the question to be, does the need of evidence in assertions are subjective in natural science? I personally believe that, each assertion deserves an equal treatment of being validate before being dismissed as Richard van de Lagemaat quoted, many scientific discoveries are counter-intuitive and go against untutored common sense. Logically, as the need of evidence is arguably important in natural science, the same must go to other areas of knowledge, including religion. Nevertheless, proofs of the existence of God are just too vague that they can be easily dismissed by skeptics. While skeptics based their argument of this matter, Sheikh Muhammed Salih Al-Munajjid explained that there are actually three categories of evidence which proves the existence of God, which are the instinctive evidence, tangible evidence and revelatory evidence. ...read more.

Conclusion

(Christina, 2009), are they abusing the word ?faith? in order to protect religion from the conception that each assertion must be supported with observable evidence? From the knower?s perspective, it could not be agreed more that the need of evidence in religion is indeed vague, thus, I personally believe that a fine line must be drawn in order to distinguish reliable assertions and unreliable assertions. As natural science demands empirical evidence before any assertions can be made, religion has always been associated with metaphysical claims which differ itself from other areas of knowledge. It has been made clear that both areas of knowledge deserve different treatment towards any assertions without evidence. Nevertheless, I believe that the individual who asserts the claim plays a major role in how we evaluate the claim. In natural science for instance, an individual who is highly-regarded in the field of which he is making the claim on, would know what he is asserting. Thus, if this is this case, even if the claim made has no evidence, it is very likely that the claim would be true. The same applies to religion. In a nutshell, reason must be put in front of other ways of knowing when evaluating any assertions. Only by doing this, our decision would be rational and any biasness could be avoided. ...read more.

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