• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The knowledge that we value the most is the knowledge for which we can provide the strongest justifications." To what extent would you agree with this claim?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Rammy Abssi March 24, 2009 Mr. Gammon 11a - TOK TOK Essay "The knowledge that we value the most is the knowledge for which we can provide the strongest justifications." To what extent would you agree with this claim? The strongest justifications of knowledge are provided by the knowledge which we value the most. In general, I agree with this claim. Knowledge is the awareness or understanding gained through experience or study. There are numerous examples which support the belief of this claim. Basically there are two main topics which can be considered when studying knowledge. First, there is FACT. A fact means that there is only one answer and that knowledge is true. For something to be true it needs to be: * True for everyone * Eternally true * Independent of the beliefs of others Another topic when considering knowledge is opinion. ...read more.

Middle

This is an example of a justified opinion because it is not eternally true and true for everyone. When I dislocated my ankle playing football, I began to cry and I was shaking because of the amount of pain I was in. This opinion is justified because I actually have been through the pain and I have felt the result of dislocating an ankle. Now you can relate this back to the main idea of: "The knowledge that we value the most is the knowledge for which we can provide the strongest justifications." The first opinion is a personal opinion and had a very weak justification; in fact it had no justification. This is in relation of the knowledge which we value, and it is clearly seen that my favorite ice cream flavor is not valuable knowledge. On the other hand, the second example, a justified opinion, had a justification, and in result it was seen that the second opinion was knowledge which was more valuable. ...read more.

Conclusion

Emotion is not very valuable because it is not suitable and useful for almost any claim. When emotion is brought up in an argument as support, it results in a very weak argument. In fact, that side of the argument becomes illogical due to the fact that emotion is very abstract and has no strong justifications. Overall, I believe that the knowledge that we value the most is the knowledge for which we can provide the strongest justifications for. This is clearly shown in many different examples, including an example of a personal opinion and a justified opinion. An opinion which is valuable knowledge would be a justified opinion. A counter argument to why I agree with this claim would be the fact that love is valuable and love has very weak, if no justifications. Love is an emotion and in conclusion emotions are not a valuable knowledge. This is because using emotion as support is illogical and therefore, emotion would not be valuable knowledge. Word Count: 808 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our International Baccalaureate Theory of Knowledge section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related International Baccalaureate Theory of Knowledge essays

  1. The knowledge that we value the most is the knowledge for which we can ...

    Multiple axioms together can provide as strong justifications for new knowledge, such the knowledge that so long as an angle is kept constant in a right angle triangle, the ratio of the sides constituting that side will always be equal.

  2. In expanding the field of knowledge we but increase the horizon of ignorance.- Henry ...

    only fully understands what Miller meant by the quotation from the question, but is in full agreement with it. After reading the article the knower can realise that when he embarked on his journey to learn about the "Cargo Cult Sciences" he was ignorant, not only to the answers he sought, but also ignorant to the fact he was ignorant.

  1. All ethical statements are relative. By examining the justifications for - and implications of ...

    This is where ethical relativists may diverge. Some may argue that those living in another country are obliged to respect and abide to the traditions and moral opinions of the country they are in.

  2. Evidence. One of the main differences between I am certain and it is certain ...

    Incorrect use of the sine rule will give an invalid answer - yet we cannot be personally certain of its validity, as there is no evidence backing it up. The only available evidence is from the law itself, which is universally certain, but only self-referential.

  1. PRINCIPLES ARE VALUABLE ONLY TO THE EXTENT THAT THEY ARE USEFUL NOT FOR THEMSELVES. ...

    The only person that takes advantage of our deed is the lady, but sooner or later she will forget about the event. Why should we let a pregnant woman sit down in the bus? Neither of the sides really gains anything.

  2. The knowledge that we value the most is the knowledge for which we can ...

    It is of more value to me. In this fashion, we can continue to determine relative values. If I care more about sharks than tidal waves, I am going to continue to learn more about sharks which I am interested in.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work