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To what extent are the areas of knowledge defined by their methodologies rather than their content?

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Introduction

To what extent are various areas of knowledge defined by their methodologies rather than their content? There are different areas of knowledge that we know of that needs to be defined either by their methodologies rather than their content. Examples that can be defined by their methodologies are areas such as Mathematics; examples that can be defined by their content are subjects like Art. Yet, there is no fixed rule of which area of knowledge is preferably defined by their methodologies, or which area should be defined by their content. However, I think that most areas of knowledge are defined by their methodologies than their content. It is important to first define what is methodology and content before analyzing to what extent are various areas of knowledge defined from those two aspects. I think that methodology can be defined as the methods that are taken to reach a certain conclusion or theory of an area of knowledge, content can be defined as the details that have been given throughout the information given. ...read more.

Middle

However, areas of knowledge such as Art, whether in the literature perspective or the artistic perspective, it is defined through the content rather than their methodology. When analyzing an art piece, you would analyze the content of the picture rather than analyzing the methods used. For example, we would be taught to analyze the tone, color, and positioning of lighting in an art piece, but little is analyzed about the brush strokes that are being used or the kind method that is used to paint or draw the painting. In a literature piece, whether a prose or poem, we are all told to analyze it's content and the moral of the story. Yet, this is arguable as when analyzing a text, it is important to analyze about the literary devices used in a text, and this can be classified as a method of defining a certain area of knowledge, and in this case, literature. ...read more.

Conclusion

However, we learn about natural sciences, such as Biology, through experimenting, as a conclusion given in the textbooks can be proven. This shows that in Natural Sciences, we learn through methods rather than content, but in human sciences, we learn through the content that has been given to us. Methodology and content define different areas of knowledge differently, yet they have their own advantages and disadvantages of using one aspect to analyze an area of knowledge individually. If we analyze a subject through methodology, for example, a text, and analyze how it is written, we will then neglect the possible true meaning behind. Likewise, if we analyze a subject through the content only, we will then neglect the ways that are used to show and support the points that has been written in the text. Therefore I think that the extent areas of knowledge whether it should be defined by methodologies or content should be equal. ...read more.

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