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TOK May 07/08 topic 2

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Introduction

Are reason and emotion equally necessary in justifying moral decisions? Canic Ng TOK 12 Word count 1346 Topic 2 Mr. Vicente Everyday we make choices, every choice creates an effect in our world, the effects can be good, or can be bad, "every action creates an equal and opposite reaction."1 As observed in nature. We make choices every day, every second of our existence, from walking around, to what words we chose to express. In the making of each choice our minds takes in factors of emotion, along with reasons to justify our decision. Emotions make up whom we are, without emotions we would be nothing more than a machine. Yet we must not be clouded by our emotions, which would make use do unreasonable things. Although the knowledge that is presented in this essay is only from one mind, there is an obvious limitation in knowledge. No matter how hard one might try we can't write out our thoughts without having our own biases in the topic. This is the thought of one person, objections can't be eliminated, there is no verification of this topic, only the verification of the existence this essay brings with it. Which leads to the first issue, no matter how much one might try, our decisions will always be tainted by our emotions. ...read more.

Middle

Reasons' approach to life is more logical, less impulsive, and to the point, judging things harshly, like black and white, conversely our emotion would stand in-between to act as a middle ground, like a gray scale. If what was said so far was true then how does one emotionally justify a moral issue, one such as choosing to believe. Belief is a feeling that something is real or true, so our beliefs are based on our feeling, furthermore feelings are an emotion, which then leads us back to square 1. However there are many people which have a religion, with religion based on belief, and in turn is our emotion we then start to develop a way of substituting emotion as if it was reason, making it true if we believe, but if we oppose it, it would be label as false. By tricking itself with reason our mind makes emotion justify morality,. Prior to our action of sitting in front of the TV, we make the choice of going to the TV then planting our big lazy butts on the surface of our choice to watch what you desire. How do we justify our decision? There is no logical reason for watching TV, other than for our pure enjoyment, or perhaps it was for an assignment. ...read more.

Conclusion

If we look at emotion as well as reason we find that they are very similar but yet they are different. Emotion along with reason are both ways of knowing, each as significant as the other. Without the presence of each other our judgments would lack in crucial areas, which helps us, interpret the world around us. If reason were left out in judgment, our unstable emotion would then produce a inconsistent answer, one which there is no limit to, but if all we had was a sense of reason to guide us onto our judgment, without emotion, our judgment would lack the human quality in which it demands, making it nothing more than a calculated answer. This essay believes that it is equally important to regard both reason, as well as emotion to be equally important in the making of each choice to justify our moral decision. Emotions make up whom we are, without emotions we would be nothing more than a machine. Yet we must not be clouded by our emotions, which would make use do irresponsible things. Thus there is reason. Justifying moral decision requires, reason, and emotion, however we must not let our emotion take control of our decision. We have to aware of our moral judgments for it creates a ripple effect in the world around us. Newton's Third Law of Motion1 ...read more.

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