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We as people rely on our senses in our everyday lives: To hear, to smell, to see, to feel, and to taste, but when should we ever really rely on them in order to receive the truth?

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Introduction

Relying on our senses We as people rely on our senses in our everyday lives: To hear, to smell, to see, to feel, and to taste, but when should we ever really rely on them in order to receive the "truth"? I think it all comes down to what we think "the truth" is. We all have a different understanding of what the word "truth" means. Our version of truth may differ drastically from what others think it means. In the dictionary truth is defined as "the true or actual state of a matter". But when exactly do we know what the actual state of matter is? I believe it all comes down to a matter of opinion, and the ways of knowing. The only way to know if something is actually true, would have to be if you have empirical evidence, but most of the time, we don't have any. ...read more.

Middle

They start to believe what their minds what them to see, in this case water. The person begins to see puddles of water, when in reality nothing is there, but since we rely on our senses so often, we automatically believe that what we are seeing has to be correct, and that's not always the case. In this situation the person isn't receiving the "truth" from there senses. I strongly believe that not two people are the same, therefore we all think differently and will have our own opinions, and way of thinking. So what I think is right, may not seem right to somebody else. For example, if I feel a rock, and I think it's so smooth, someone else may feel the exact same rock, and think it's very bumpy and rough. Who is telling the truth, and who is right? ...read more.

Conclusion

Emotions also come in the way of "truth" and our senses. A low self-esteem teenage girl may see herself as fat, ugly, and unwanted. All her friends may think she's the prettiest one of her group of friends, but that low self-esteem gets in the way of her acknowledging the fact that she is loved, and wanted. Our emotions get in the way of realizing the "truth", because we are sometimes afraid of accepting this so called "truth". I believe that the only time we should really trust our senses would have to be in a life or death situation. For example if you smell fire, trust your sense of smell, and leave your house so you won't burn in there! Other than that, I believe we shouldn't trust them. If we want the truth of something we should find evidence of what we think is true, and prove our point, because our senses are not accurate. ...read more.

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