• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

We as people rely on our senses in our everyday lives: To hear, to smell, to see, to feel, and to taste, but when should we ever really rely on them in order to receive the truth?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Relying on our senses We as people rely on our senses in our everyday lives: To hear, to smell, to see, to feel, and to taste, but when should we ever really rely on them in order to receive the "truth"? I think it all comes down to what we think "the truth" is. We all have a different understanding of what the word "truth" means. Our version of truth may differ drastically from what others think it means. In the dictionary truth is defined as "the true or actual state of a matter". But when exactly do we know what the actual state of matter is? I believe it all comes down to a matter of opinion, and the ways of knowing. The only way to know if something is actually true, would have to be if you have empirical evidence, but most of the time, we don't have any. ...read more.

Middle

They start to believe what their minds what them to see, in this case water. The person begins to see puddles of water, when in reality nothing is there, but since we rely on our senses so often, we automatically believe that what we are seeing has to be correct, and that's not always the case. In this situation the person isn't receiving the "truth" from there senses. I strongly believe that not two people are the same, therefore we all think differently and will have our own opinions, and way of thinking. So what I think is right, may not seem right to somebody else. For example, if I feel a rock, and I think it's so smooth, someone else may feel the exact same rock, and think it's very bumpy and rough. Who is telling the truth, and who is right? ...read more.

Conclusion

Emotions also come in the way of "truth" and our senses. A low self-esteem teenage girl may see herself as fat, ugly, and unwanted. All her friends may think she's the prettiest one of her group of friends, but that low self-esteem gets in the way of her acknowledging the fact that she is loved, and wanted. Our emotions get in the way of realizing the "truth", because we are sometimes afraid of accepting this so called "truth". I believe that the only time we should really trust our senses would have to be in a life or death situation. For example if you smell fire, trust your sense of smell, and leave your house so you won't burn in there! Other than that, I believe we shouldn't trust them. If we want the truth of something we should find evidence of what we think is true, and prove our point, because our senses are not accurate. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our International Baccalaureate Theory of Knowledge section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related International Baccalaureate Theory of Knowledge essays

  1. TOK - Can we rely on perception to lead us to the truth

    to carefully analysing and understanding them, proving children, adolescents and adults 'see' things differently. 2. Culture affects the use of language in perception, like how Arabs have thousands of different words for camel. 3. Society includes the family background, education, and environment.

  2. How much does taste really matter in wine tasting

    Besides knowledge, there are many other things that affect a person's preference for wine. Examples are that some wine consumers would only want naturally produced wines or bottles with a modest carbon footprint. Others are status-seekers and score-chasers, who use wine as a tool to look more refined and gain higher status.

  1. Free essay

    When should we trust our senses to give us truth?

    But for these individuals, there was obvious detail in their work which could only be portrayed through exact observation of this changed perception. For them, these ideas and images were the whole truth and they could not experience any other reality.

  2. Context is all (Margaret Atwood). Does this mean that there is no such thing ...

    The example of objective truth mentioned above is a good example of misinterpretation of truth when the context is changed. Such a fact was not known in the middle ages and one would be considered crazy if they believed in such theories.

  1. "Context is all" (Margaret Atwood). Does this mean that there is no such thing ...

    and he deduced by no more than reason that it all boiled down to; I doubt that I exist, therefore I think, ergo I am. When I first heard this deduction, it seemed to me that it was flawless. However I remember looking around the room I was in at

  2. How far can we rely on our senses to tell us the truth?

    Numbers are also insensible. Suppose I have a bowl with twenty four cherries. I eat them all. Now I can ?taste? the sweetness and sourness of the cherries not the number 24. The term ?Omair? is a name not me.

  1. Context is all (Margaret Atwood). Does this mean that there is no such thing ...

    in Iraq then we see a clear difference in perception of the truth. The West believes it is liberating while the Iraqi insurgency see ?liberation? as an invasion. Once again, the truth of the situation depends on the context. We see from this that one?s perception of ?truth? is dependent on things such as cultural background and political viewpoint.

  2. What do we really see?

    Sciences tend to really show our limitations within our sense perception for example when seeing the sunlight we see a white light when it is actually the 7 colors of the spectrum this shows that we see according to our own perception which tends to be limited, also when viewing

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work