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International Baccalaureate: World Literature

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  1. A Glorious Morning, Comrade contains humour, yet You Are Now Entering The Human Heart has a darker mood and is full of tension. In neither stories, are the young generation able to understand the point of view of the older generation

    Miss A is a teacher, who is near retiring age. She teaches very young children. She has a strong fear of snakes, based on her experiences and her traditional beliefs that snakes are dangerous and should be killed. In the story, the author described Miss A as ?a city woman born and bred. All snakes were creatures to kill?? In contrast, the snake attendant knows more about snakes, and that not all snakes are dangerous. The attendant expects Miss A to have a relaxed attitude towards the snake. As such, he told the children that ?Your teacher has a snake around her neck and she?s not afraid?.

    • Word count: 763
  2. Discuss how Camus explores the themes of alientation in Chaper 1. - Include specific example and details of how Meursault is detatched from the people he meets, and the subsequent events following the news of his mothers death.

    Meursault has the tendency to be oblivious to any emotional, social, and interpersonal content of given situations, however he conteracts this motion with the intense focus on physical and practical aspects. In chapter 1, Meursault focuses on the practical details surrounding his mother?s death. Meursalts interest in nature, and weather just before his mothers vigal shows that he feels no greif or sadness. He is able to enjoy the sunny weather and scenery despite the moloncony occasion in which is taking place.

    • Word count: 862
  3. In your view, how have literary techniques been used to reveal memorable ideas in Li Cunxins Maos Last Dancer?

    Li uses emotive language when Teacher Xiao insists that ?Great things don?t come easily?, highlighting the absolute necessity for Li to try as hard as he can to achieve his dreams. Great deeds require supreme effort and courage in the face of adversity, and require self-belief to not give up when things go wrong. Through the quote ?Work hard and make a life of your own. There is nothing here except starvation and struggle!? he reinforces the same concept of struggling to achieve one?s goals by being focused and determined.

    • Word count: 879
  4. Throughout the whole course of Antigone, Creon carries an overbearing sense of pride and irrational belief that all women should accept their inferior role

    Furthermore, Creon makes it very clear that he does not even put forth consideration that a woman could have fulfilled this act by stating to Zeus, ?if you don?t find the man who buried that corpse, the very man? (346-347). However, when Creon does discover that it was indeed a woman who had the integrity to go against his word, he is beyond infuriated and humiliated that an individual below his ranking in society could have such audacity to go against his word.

    • Word count: 1068
  5. "Candide" - Political, Social, and Economic Analysis

    The arrogant mindset of the nobility is also displayed in chapter 15 when the Baron of Thunder?ten?tronckh, and Miss Cunegund?s brother, refuses to allow Candide to marry his sister. Though the Baron and Candide had previously just been rejoicing over their unexpected reunion, at the mention of Candide wanting to marry Miss Cunegund, things automatically turned for the worse.

    • Word count: 1120
  6. How adopting a philosophical standpoint can alter one's interpretation of the text "The Outsider" by Albert Camus: An absurdist and postcolonial reading of the text

    ________________ ________________ 1. Development of reading, writing, discussion and analysis skills through continual practice. ________________ ________________ 1. Reading closely in order to perceive textual detail. ________________ ________________ 1. Logical presentation of central ideas with supportive detail. ________________ ________________ Students should be able to demonstrate the following understandings: ________________ ________________ 1. The moral, social and political meanings of literature. ________________ ________________ 1. The concept of convention, and the understanding of the particular conventions of figurative language, levels of meaning analysis, structure and reader positioning. ________________ ________________ 1. Text and context. ________________ Marking Criteria Excel V.

    • Word count: 3759
  7. In No Sugar, by Aboriginal playwright Jack Davis. The British colonizers featured in the play attempt to bring civilisation to what they see as the primordial indigenous people of Australia

    The black is associated with fear and evil. As the blackout shields the audience from seeing Mary being hit so explicitly it is then left to the viewer?s imagination of what has happened. This also gives the play a sense of realism. The characterisation of Mr Neal infuriates the audience due to the way he speaks to Mary. An example is on page 92, act four scene 2 before he hits Mary, when she is disobeying his orders, and rebelling against what he is asking her to do he says ?You?ll do as I say.

    • Word count: 1208
  8. Coleridge's "Kubla Khan" and "To Nature"

    The river is a picture of huge amounts of opium oozing from the dome and running through some caverns that ordinary people did not see relating to opium as some kind of deity because according to the lines it is beyond the mankind. ?In Xanadu did Kublai Khan A stately pleasure-dome decree Where Alph, the sacred river, ran Through caverns measureless to man. So twice five miles of fertile ground With walls and towers were girdled round: And there were gardens bright with sinuous rills, Where blossomed many an incense-bearing tree ?(1-9)

    • Word count: 920
  9. The novel Remembering Babylon is a reflection of ideological concerns of the author David Malouf. Identify these and consider how they are reflected within the text

    refuse to ?let go? of their European connection. This ideological concern is further emphasized with the portrayal of George Abbot, who within his mind is an English gentleman due to his high social rank as an educator at the tender age of nineteen. He is unable to conform into the Australian life, as reflected by his refusal to ?roll his sleeves up? in the harsh climate. Moreover, he is attracted to anything that reminded him of his ?home? Europe- ?he was accustomed to read French books every afternoon? which ?relieved him of his young colonial boots?and assumed familiar colours.? In addition, George Abbot also admires Mrs.

    • Word count: 1323
  10. "A Family Supper," by Kazuo Ishiguro, is a story of uncertainty, nervousness, emotions, and loss of love in the family.

    The garden creates an atmosphere of anxiety and worries: "Much of the garden had fallen into shadow" (466). The garden provides sensory background about her mother. Her worries, beliefs in ghosts, and disappointment on her son's behavior leads her to commit suicide as narrator agrees that "My relationship with my parents had become somewhat strained around the period" (465). It's a part of Japanese culture that people don't live a disgrace life. It's an honor to die. Suicide for the business partner and even for the air force pilots is glorified by the father.

    • Word count: 1267
  11. I am Cassandra. I was a princess, a cursed prophetess, daughter of the king of Troy

    It?s a house of god hates, where men are killed and the floor is red with blood. Here is a unbearable stink of blood like a slaughter house. I can see the past, the sinned days of this house, the vision of Thyestes, who unknowingly ate his own son? the cruelty murder of this house. I hear children crying. Oh! No! I don?t want to see. I don?t want to hear. I want relief from this. Why do you create us, God? What pleasures do you feel giving us so painful life? All only face the situation, but I,,, I not only become the victim but also see the horrible past and future.

    • Word count: 885
  12. Analysis of Novel "Youth in Revolt" and the character Nick Twisp

    Therefore, it can be concluded that the novel exhibits both picaresque elements as well as romance elements. 2. The character that is most developed is Nick Twisp. He is the main protagonist of the novel and we read through the novel in his perspective. Nick is a sexually hyperactive honour roll student, but circumstances have forced him to live with his mother and her various boyfriends. Nick?s family life can be seen as one of the challenges to Nick?s normal development in the story.

    • Word count: 737
  13. Reflective Statement: Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress

    It is better explained by relating to Plato?s Allegory of the cave. The thesis behind this allegory is the basic idea that everything that we perceive is imperfect and these imperfections are like reflections of the real truth. In the story Plato establishes four prisoners inside of a cave chained down and forced to look at the front wall of the cave. There are basically four parts to it: first is when they are all in the cave, forced to look at the wall, there is a fire behind them and shapes are projected on to the wall by other people.

    • Word count: 485
  14. In William Goldings Lord of the Flies, and in John Knowles A Separate Peace, the fact that man will let his inner malevolence dominate if given the chance is demonstrated.

    In the Lord of the Flies, Simon is portrayed as the natural good, or savior of the lot of boys who end up on the island. However, no matter how much good can be in one person, there will always be natural evil that will balance man. ?Sitting before the Lord of the Flies, a stinking, fly-ridden pig's head on a stick, Simon is made to recognize the human nature of the real beast: that he himself has the capacity for evil as well as for good? (Tiger).

    • Word count: 2241
  15. macbeth's state of mind while going to kill duncan

    I will explore Shakespeare?s use of language, plot and other characters to vividly portray Macbeth?s final hour of humanity. At first, Macbeth is taken back by the prospects of his future that the witches propose to him at their first meeting when he demands they speak. They address him directly, hailing him as Thane of Glamis(which he is), Thane of Cawdor(an aspect of dramatic irony for we as the readers already know that the title was already given to him, the previous one being a traitor) and King, sometime in the future. This renders him speechless and Banquo, his companion, points out ?Good sir, why do you start and seem to fear things that do sound so fair?? Banquo is wondering why Macbeth was not amused or at least cynical of such great prospects after prodding them.

    • Word count: 1183
  16. In his essay Tragedy and the Common Man, Arthur Miller describes the heart and spirit of the average man, and the nature of his tragic hero Willy Loman.

    Throughout the play, his lies, adulterous behaviour and unappreciative regard of his family suggest that Willy only has one real value; being ?well-liked?, something that ultimately proves to be vacuous and futile. Although he seems to value the concept of the American Dream, the innovative and enterprising nature of this concept seems to pass him by, as he enters a distinctly unoriginal job, a salesman, in the world?s largest purchaser of commercial goods. He does work hard, but only for something he deems worthwhile; Willy sees no harm in accepting money from Charlie every week, as long as it is

    • Word count: 873
  17. The Unnumbered Commentary

    This initial lack of action within ?The Unnumbered? indicates that Nio lives a boring life and renders him an unexciting as a central character. Indeed this lack of conflict between Nio and the setting of ?The Unnumbered? serves to reinforce the idea that Nio is accustomed to his life on the sidelines; this, coupled with the indifferent atmosphere expressed through the opening narrative of the passage consisting of few opinions and largely based upon Nio?s factual aids the overall effect of highlighting the lacklustre nature of North?s unlikely protagonist.

    • Word count: 1254
  18. The Battlers Commentary

    The inclusion of narrative hooks at the passage?s opening, such as ?If Snow had taken the road through Belburra, instead of the track through Currawong, his whole life would have run a different course?, alludes to a great change of attitude or events, yet because no further action or events are narrated in this passage and Snow remains an unchanging static character throughout this extract, this delay in the expected life-changing action serves to dramatically heighten the tension in the novel.

    • Word count: 440
  19. Oedipus - Choose at least 2 supporting characters in the play and discuss how and to what effect they contribute to the play

    Therefore, after Tiresias is reluctant to confess the prophecy, the severe anger with which Oedipus reacts to the highly esteemed man shocks Sophocles? audience. It also presents to them another side of his protagonist?s nature, one that could make Oedipus capable of murder, thus strengthening the plausibility of the prophecy as truth. The blindness of Tiresias serves to augment the dramatic irony within ?Oedipus the King? to the effect that an association between sight and fatalism is developed, as is that of blindness and a disbelief of the prophecy .

    • Word count: 1391
  20. the experiences of Peter Skrzynecki as a migrant to Australia through his poems and the visual imagery portrayed by Delacroix show us that there are a number of important elements that surround the concept of belonging.

    The adversity of immigration and its impact of an individual?s sense of belonging are explored through Peter Skrzynecki?s ?Immigrant Chronicle? and in his particular poems, ?Feliks Skrzynecki? and ?Migrant Hostel?. Highlighting the challenges of how displacement from heritage and cultural beliefs or perspectives can affect their identity to belong. Correspondingly, in Ferdinand Delacroix?s painting, ?Liberty Leading the People? in 1830, derived from the French Revolution when common bourgeois class people challenged the monarchy for their rights. The painting is a connotation of the strides for an uprising that has united the working middle class of France.

    • Word count: 1259
  21. Modernity plays a major role in the play Death of a Salesman written by Arthur Miller.

    Significantly, Willy reaches for modern objects, the car and the gas heater, to assist him in his suicide attempts. Modernity plays a major role in the play ?Death of a Salesman? written by Arthur Miller. William Loman the father of biff and happy Loman and the husband of Linda, is a man living on the edge of modern America, in the late 1940s. Willy is constantly trying to obtain the best things for his family, as technology and science are advancing, the business world advanced too.

    • Word count: 536
  22. Andrew Marvell and the Metaphysical Poem. Considered by many to be his most famous poem, To His Coy Mistress was probably written in the early 1650s

    His friendship with Milton allowed him to be attached to Oliver Cromwell's political sphere, and in 1659 was elected to Parliament, where he remained as a vocation until his death. Often, he would satirize and criticism his political enemies in poetry, sly enough as to not be considered libelous, but plain enough to make a point. His style was elegant, quite witty, and used events of the time, public and personal, as inspiration; In fact, many of his poems were not even published until after his death, through the machinations of his housekeeper and potential lover, Mary Palmer (Smith).

    • Word count: 1254
  23. In The Wind in the Willows, author Keneth Grahame portrays each character as having a particular role within an anthropomorphized nuclear family.

    As Mole is underground cleaning his home, Grahame writes that something up above was calling him imperiously" (p.2). This imperious voice is the voice of spring-- a voice that, for Mole, is strong enough to persuade him away from work towards a more inviting outside world. Mole is at once given to his childlike impulses when he obeys the voice of spring and disregards his chores altogether. When Mole reaches the hedge on the far side of the meadow, there is an elderly rabbit standing at the gap waiting to collect a toll payment. Grahame writes that the rabbit "was bowled over in an instant by the impatient and contemtuous Mole, who trotted along the side of the hedge chaffing the other rabbits as they peeped hurriedly from their holes to see what the row was about.

    • Word count: 2207
  24. In Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert, Berthe Bovary acts as an important character despite her lack of dialogue and actions

    She reasons that a girl is "continually held back" and constantly faces "restrictions against her" (Flaubert 101). Emma becomes engrossed in bearing a son and convinces herself that a boy will be the only way for her to obtain happiness. Upon birthing a girl, Emma disappointedly realizes that she has not considered a name for a daughter because of her overconfidence in bearing a son.

    • Word count: 486

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