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A prime example of gothic literature, Emily Brontes Wuthering Heights employs exemplary usage of gothic elements such as weather, the supernatural, and darkness.

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Introduction

A prime example of gothic literature, Emily Bronte?s Wuthering Heights employs exemplary usage of gothic elements such as weather, the supernatural, and darkness. Resembling the epitome of classic horror movie characteristics, Bronte?s novel illuminates the darkness of life and the imperfection of the human soul. Heathcliff represents the ?criminal,? torturing not only himself but also the individuals who surround him. Plaguing his victims, Heathcliff affects Cathy Linton, Hareton, and Nelly through his destructive path. In fact, Heathcliff?s role as a demonic character directly impacts the lives of those closest to him. Moreover, just as movies illustrate ominous settings, Bronte uses gothic imagery to develop themes in the book. Throughout Wuthering Heights, one of the most prominent features include the use of imagery during the course of the book, which brings about a unique and emotional experience that touches on the primary themes of the book. Of the prominent imagery in the novel used, the most prominent instances are Heathcliff and the sinister aspects that relate to him, elements of nature and their influence in the characters? lives, and how love and passion or the absence of both cause Heathcliff to act out. In Wuthering Heights, Heathcliff is portrayed as a troubled character who seeks revenge for his problems. ...read more.

Middle

(121). All of these qualities show the detrimental state of Heathcliff as a character and his effect on others. Conversely, Bronte uses the elements of nature to indicate that life revolves around the changes and growth of the environment; through imagery, she uses nature to represent Lockwood?s first stay at Wuthering Heights, Catherine Earnshaw?s dissatisfaction with Edgar Linton, and Cathy and Hareton?s budding relationship. Certainly, the ominous weather haunting Lockwood in the beginning of the book foreshadows his impending and tumultuous night at Wuthering Heights. Specifically, Lockwood says, ?A sorrowful sight I saw: dark night coming down prematurely, and sky and hills mingled in one bitter whirl of wind suffocating snow? (13). By illustrating this scene using the images of storms, skies, and hills, Bronte essentially connects the elements of nature with imminent threat in the plot. Moreover, Catherine?s description of her relationship with Edgar reflects the gradual changes of the forest and of the seasons. Cathy tells Nelly Dean, ?My love for Linton is like the foliage of the woods: time will change it, I?m well aware, as winter changes the trees? (83). Clearly, Catherine uses natural elements to depict her shallow love for Edgar. ...read more.

Conclusion

In hopes that he may be with Catherine in the afterlife by opening up her coffin, he admits that he ?bribed the sexton to pull [the side] away when I?m laid there, and slide mine out too? (297) so that they may be together eternally. Throughout Emily Bronte?s Wuthering Heights, one of the most prominent features include the use of imagery during the course of the book, which brings about a unique and emotional experience that touches on the primary themes of the book. Specifically, Emily Bronte?s depiction of Heathcliff as a demonic and savage character directly relates to Lucifer in Paradise Lost, by John Milton. Essentially, Bronte indicates the theme of the presence of the Devil through Heathcliff?s life as a vengeful individual. Moreover, Bronte creates patterns between elements of nature and the lives of the individual characters to foreshadow and highlight the theme. She employs images such as the moors, hills, skies, and storms to connect the growth and changes in nature to the gradual ?ups and downs? of life.Similarly, she indicates the theme of the influence of love through the destructive behavior of Heathcliff after the death of Catherine. Certainly, love drives the decisions made by multiple characters in the book, especially Heathcliff. Clearly, Emily Bronte?s Wuthering Heights tells the timeless tale of the fallen angel, who succumbs to the destructiveness that comes from the absence of love. ...read more.

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