• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

An exploration of Desdemonas transgression of social norms within Shakespeares Othello.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Celeste Ngooi Y4 An exploration of Desdemona?s transgression of social norms within Shakespeare?s Othello. In Othello, according to the expectations of the Elizabethan patriarchal society, women were expected to be obedient to the men in their lives, be it their fathers or husbands, in other words to be subservient. However, Shakespeare allows for some deviation from this social matrix through the female character of Desdemona. This essay will explore the extent of Desdemona?s successful transgression of social norms within Othello through the ways in which Desdemona disrupts social conventions. Desdemona is first objectified and possessed by her father within the play. After Desdemona decides to elope with Othello, Iago cries, "Thieves! Thieves! Thieves! / Look to your house, your daughter, and your bags," clearly equating Desdemona to Brabantio's property (Oth. I.iii.76-9). Furthermore, Brabantio?s strict control of Desdemona is apparent, he refuses to accept that she decided to carry out her elopement, attributing her actions to "spells and medicines bought of mountebanks" that Othello must have used (I. iii. 61), ignoring her role in the romance and courtship. Indicating that if Desdemona were to carry out actions he disapproved, she was not in the right frame of mind, believing his daughter to be completely obedient and subservient to his whims, refusing to comprehend her own choices. ...read more.

Middle

It is not only the absence of her father?s permission for Desdemona?s marriage to Othello that is problematic. The fact that she chooses for herself, choosing a man outside her class, culture and even race further disrupts the social order within Othello. In the Venetian society within the play, it is extremely unnatural for a white woman to marry a black man. To elope with an upstanding senator of Venice poses one kind of threat to the civic order, but to elope with an immigrant redoubles this threat That Desdemona should so disjoin from nature indicates her transgression from social norms. The subscription that Desdemona?s desire for a man outside of her class, race and culture is so deeply seated within the males? psyche in Othello that even Othello himself observes such a moving away from nature within Desdemona, ?I do not think but Desdemona?s honest.[?] And yet, how nature erring from itself-??(III.iii.259, 263) when Iago, first tells him of Desdemona?s infidelity. In response, Iago replies ?of her own clime, complexion, and degree, whereto we see in all things nature tends?Foh! One may smell in such a will most rank, foul disproportion, thoughts unnatural?( III.iii.263-266), driving home the fact that Desdemona has successfully transgressed some sort of natural order. ...read more.

Conclusion

Desdemona refuses to be returned to her previous objectification at the hour of her death. Thus, it can be seen that despite her death serving to restore the social order within the play, Desdemona continues to fight against patriarchal notions as long as she is capable. In conclusion, despite various societal pressures being exerted upon Desdemona to conform to patriarchal notions, as seen through the men in the play, Desdemona does transgress such pressures. She asserts her own identity, refusing to be defined in accordance to the men in her life, even defying the Venetian law through the presence of her feminine voice in the Venetian court. Desdemona further transgresses the social order by making her own choices and standing up when faced with patriarchal pressures. She also wields power over Othello and knowingly employs it, representative of a strong and willful woman, clearly going against the patriarchal system within Othello. However, despite these successful transgressions, Desdemona is unable to maintain her success as seen through her death within the play, which restores the social order and making her previous transgressions null. Thus, Desdemona?s success in transgressing social order is great but the extent to which she is able to maintain it, is small. Word count: 1510 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our International Baccalaureate World Literature section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related International Baccalaureate World Literature essays

  1. 'The social position of women is clearly shown to be subordinate in Naguib Mahfouz's ...

    When beaten, Jaada 'howled wildly and swung his fists in the air'. This is a very vivid and funny image, especially with the words 'howled wildly' which is very animalistic, and along with the fact that she beats him

  2. The Course of Justice . The Role of Women in William ...

    Unfortunately, this sane view of the villain does not last long after a few faltering words drop from Richards's eloquent lips and a marriage date is set. For a while, hope is lost that Anne is going to return to her intelligent demeanor, however, soon after her husband's coronation, the truth is revealed to her anew.

  1. An exploration of the ways in which injustice in both novels is revealed. ...

    The breakfast table is where Ivan recounts his times of freedom during the day: "Apart from sleep, the only time a prisoner lives for himself is ten minutes in the morning at breakfast, five minutes over dinner, and five at supper" (p.

  2. Desdemona in Othello. Shakespeare portrays a woman who refuses to accept the socially ...

    Do you perceive in all this noble company Where most you owe obedience? DESDEMONA My noble father, I do perceive here a divided duty. To you I am bound for life and education. My life and education both do learn me How to respect you.

  1. Review of Death in Venice

    As the story moves on, von Aschenbach starts to scrutinize more details of the boy - his 'pale and jagged' teeth, 'striped linen suit', even the boy's foreign language transforms into music to von ASchenbach's ears, the boy's 'smooth armpits' shiny hollows of his knees and bluish veins.

  2. Richard III essay

    His physical features also played a crucial role in his mind set and approach to life after the War of the Roses. Unlike other soldiers who courted women with ease, Richard's distorted figure was a repellent for women. "He capers nimbly in a lady's chamber, To the lascivious pleasing of

  1. How far and in what ways is Pat Barkers reader invited to challenge the ...

    This is the Club to end all Clubs.? Indeed, underneath Prior?s facade is a sense of unworthiness, emphasized by his belonging to the lower class which he is self conscious of. We know that he was discriminated at the front because of his background: ?It?s made perfectly clear when you

  2. Much Ado About Nothing Links between Beatrice and Benedicks relationship and Shakespeares Sonnets

    Are you yet living? this makes it clear to the reader that they are equal sparring partners. As we read on it is indicated that Beatrice and Benedick had had a previous encounter of love together; while talking to Don Perdo about Benedick?s heart, she states ?he lent it me

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work