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Analysis of Dancing Classes by Gwen Raverat

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Introduction

Analysis of 'Dancing Classes' by Gwen Raverat.... Childhoods suppose to be the best moment of one's life. Usually when we recall our childhood, we see naughtiness, eagerness to learn something new, filled with questions and most of all being happy. Children love dancing whereas the writer, Gwen Raverat author of 'A Cambridge Childhood' used to hate them. She did not enjoy at all and she dint jus have problems with dancing, she mentions "dancing class was the worst of the social events which I dreaded as a child". She never liked to do anything. The passage is to simple, descriptive and narrative paragraphs. This passage is in first person narration. ...read more.

Middle

Maybe it all looked good on her like "hop", "wave my arms about" and "stick out my legs". She could be blinded by her hatred about these things. The shortest sentence used in the extract is "degrading antics" which means humiliating herself on purpose. Then she goes on and uses a simile, she says "felt like a lion at a circus". A lion is forced to do a masters bidding just for everyone's entertainment, she felt like that too. She dint enjoy is, everyone else enjoyed watching her. The writer uses visual imagery for us to understand better how she felt. The writer clearly hates all that happens and she's open about it. ...read more.

Conclusion

Usually people wait and let their anger build inside them but the writer acted immediately being very rude, she "kicked the heel of the child" in front of "her". For a child words like "death and torture" onto a "poor woman" are really harsh words but she uses them also as an oxymoron. She wants the teacher to suffer like she did or even worse and still feels sorry for her. On my first impression as a reader I felt that she's been exaggerating about everything it's not as bad as she portraits, especially to be using words like death and torture or being a bully. The whole extract is negative like after a long day of rehearsals, costume fitting, competition and with the suspense of the result it ends on a happy note, going "home". ?? ?? ?? ?? Shubh Chabra ...read more.

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