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Analysis of Novel "Youth in Revolt" and the character Nick Twisp

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Introduction

Alakoozi Khalid Alakoozi Mr. Mlinarski ENG4U February 28th, 2012 ISP Stage One ? Analysis of Novel 1. It is quite prevalent that the novel, ?Youth in Revolt?, contains all the elements of a picaresque novel. The novel is written in a diary format and is very satirical. In particular, the protagonist Nick Twisp exhibits a very satirical view on his life and his surroundings. The people portrayed in the book are of low social and economic class. In fact, a large portion of the novel is set in a trailer park where Nick, his mother, and his mother?s boyfriend escape to get away from unsavoury lenders. The novel uses vulgar language at times, and it is mostly focused on Nick Twisp?s attempts to lose his virginity. Although the novel can be seen as a modern picaresque masterpiece, it is infused with romantic elements, especially in Nick?s interactions with his female protagonist, Sheeni Saunders. ...read more.

Middle

During the progression of my reading of the story (appx 260 of 500 pages) both of these major conflicts have remained unresolved. 3. Meaning- The word ?meaning? is generally defined as the ?message? being portrayed from the source to the subject. Although some may believe that ?Youth in Revolt? is simply a teen novel that has no real message, I believe that it portrays a very realistic portrayal of the life of teens in the early stages of their adolescence. This is the inherent message and ?meaning? in the novel. Style ? The style of the novel is extremely unique compared to other novels in the same genre. The story is presented in the first-person point of view, whereas most fiction works utilise the third-person-view. The tone of the story is also playful, ironic, and informal at the same time. ...read more.

Conclusion

One thing I don?t necessary like in the book are the extreme details on his sexuality, but I understand that it is probably necessary in order to obtain a better understanding of his personality. 2. Some of the themes that I am thinking of pursuing are morality vs. religion, exhibited between Nick Twisp and Sheeni Saunder?s parents. Another theme that I am thinking of pursuing are the social class distinctions present in the novel between Nick Twisp and the inhabitants of the trailer park. I?ll also try to delve more deeply into the love/hate relationship exhibited by Nick and Sheeni. 3. Some of the reading strategies that I use to help me fully comprehend the book are making predictions regarding the outcome of the story, asking and answering questions regarding the story, and visualizing the story in my head. I also like to summarize the novel?s diary entries to obtain a condensed understanding of the novel. ...read more.

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