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Art features and stylistic devices of the novel Dandelion Wine by Ray Bradbury.

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Introduction

Art features and stylistic devices of the novel "Dandelion Wine" by Ray Bradbury. "Dandelion Wine" is the story of a summer, but it is also a story about people's lives and what it means to live. Douglas Spaulding is the central character in the book, and the great challenge that he faces over the course of the summer is coming to terms with life. This book is about the childhood from within, it really impressed me, showed the other side of our life. "Dandelion Wine" is a series of short stories loosely connected to summer occurrences, with Douglas and his family as recurring characters. But this book is interested not only for its plot, but for reach stylistic devices, used by the author to emphasize lots of interesting moments, emotions of characters and connections between some different short stories in the book. There are three main plans in the novel: childish (by Douglas' eyes), author's (his reasoning) and outward (pictures of town's life, parables). They are all shown differently. Childish is more adventurous, it's shown with the aid of dialogs between children (lots of exclamation marks, short phrases, interjections, slang words, pauses and dots). ...read more.

Middle

Colonel Freeleigh spanged and rattled, his jaw fell open, a mainspring shot out and dangled on the air instead of his tongue. He collapsed like a puppet on the still, one arm still waving..."2 His dreams are like symbols. Inside monologues of Douglas, depending on the reason, are distinguished with patheticalness (lofty language, speech figures, turns, composite sentences, reach descriptions) or with expressivity (intermittence, short sentences, the condition of warning, shock): "It almost happened, thought Douglas. Whatever it was it was Big, my gosh, it was Big! Something scared it off. Where is it now? Back on that bush! No, behind me! No, here... almost here..."3 "I was there, last night, in the ravine. I saw Elizabeth Ramsell. I came by here last night on the way home. I saw the lemonade glass there on the rail. Just last night it was. I could drink that, I thought... I could drink that..."4 Here's an example of pathetic monologue: "Who could say where town or wildness began? Who could say which owned what and what owned which? ...read more.

Conclusion

dry paper in hot weeds..."7 Some dialogues between children Bradbury presents with short dynamic sentences with using a lot of slang: "So Mr. Black wouldn't know, dumb! ... Okay, don't look mad. It was "sucker" or whatever."8, "... Boy, he's got a scalded look."9 and so on. Among the rhetorical figures special emphasis is put on metaphors, similes, personifications, oxymoron, parallelisms, hyperboles, euphemisms. With this reach language author puts us closer to his characters, allows us to understand all the palette of their feelings and emotions. Bradbury's language is special, attracting and unique. His characters are real; everyone can find one's habits and traits in them. Summing all these facts I can say that this book made a great impression on me. It's one of the best books about childhood which helps adults to forget at a short date about their problems and become these careless little kids they used to be some time ago. 1 Bradbury, R. Dandelion Wine, ?.: ?????-?????, 2008. p. 250 2 p. 250 3 p. 9 4 p. 209 5 p. 21 6 P. 13-14. 7 P. 21. 8 P. 228 9 P. 232 ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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