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Character of Louba Ranevsky in The Cherry Orchard by Anton Chekhov

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Introduction

Character of Louba Ranevsky in The Cherry Orchard by Anton Chekhov LUBOV. Oh, my sins. ... I've always scattered money about without holding myself in, like a madwoman, and I married a man who made nothing but debts. My husband died of champagne--he drank terribly-- and to my misfortune, I fell in love with another man and went off with him, and just at that time--it was my first punishment, a blow that hit me right on the head--here, in the river ... my boy was drowned, and I went away, quite away, never to return, never to see this river again ...I shut my eyes and ran without thinking, but _he_ ran after me ... without pity, without respect. I bought a villa near Mentone because _he_ fell ill there, and for three years I knew no rest either by day or night; the sick man wore me out, and my soul dried up. And last year, when they had sold the villa to pay my debts, I went away to Paris, and there he robbed me of all I had and threw me over and went off with another woman. I tried to poison myself. ... It was so silly, so shameful. ... And suddenly I longed to be back in Russia, my own land, with my little girl. ...read more.

Middle

She buys a villa in Mentone for the sick man, and craves for an ample reward from the heavens for her selfless love and devotion. Man proposes; god disposes. The abusive man embezzles all her funds, forsakes her, maltreats her and makes an illicit liaison with another woman. The land parts under her feet, and she finds her last resort in committing suicide. But the fate will further test her on the anvil of time. She survives, and feels inclined to her motherland, where her aristocratic roots personified in the Cherry Orchard are still living! The cherry orchard is a tragic-comic play that follows on the lines of Aristotelian drama. The structure of the passage and the broken and intermittent sentence structure unravel the tragic plight of Louba. But her tone though regretful is ironical, and is helpful in giving vent to her nostalgia. The extract presents her as a lady aware of her mistakes and her sinful life, but a lady never ready to budge an inch given her fantasies and idiosyncrasies. She is shown as a religious lady who is willing to make amends but being an enigmatic personality, she is so devoid of reason that her resolutions are adrift in the mere gust of wind, and she seeks light even in the deep darkness of Erebus. ...read more.

Conclusion

I can't live without it5." The old order changeth, yielding place to new6 The inevitable strikes and it is the advent of the dreadful August- the time for the auction of The Cherry Orchard. Time is powerful enough to teach everyone except Louba a lesson of changing according to time. Life comes full circle making them go through all the crises of their lives, and adapt themselves to the changing conditions. Barbara takes the job of housekeeper; Gayef finds a humble position in a bank. In the wake of her inaction, The Cherry Orchard is auctioned. Lopakhin emerges as the serf turned owner of Louba?s ancestral estate. Those who confront change succumb; Firs is dead and Louba is penniless but again nostalgic, ?To look at the walls and the windows for the last time. ... My dead mother used to like to walk about this room.7? [Looks round the room] Good-bye, dear house, old grandfather. The winter will go, the spring will come, and then you'll exist no more, you'll be pulled down?8 Yet she is impregnable as ever and weaves dreams of conciliating with her demon lover again in Paris. She once again moves ahead for a bleak future, keeping Firs (unaware that he is dead) and Charlotte still in her retinue, with no resource, no abode, no future, never comprehending even for a moment the repercussion of crossing the Rubicon. ...read more.

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