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Commentary on Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha - Kevin Character Analysis

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Introduction

Paul Chun En Ci (17) 6.12 Jericho Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha Written Commentary Character Analysis Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha written by Roddy Doyle is about a boy named Paddy and the experiences he has as a child. This essay, however, will be focusing on Paddy's best friend, Kevin. Kevin is not the central character in the novel, yet he is still a very important character. We can see that the attitude of the other boys in the group towards him chances as his dominance over them slow deteriorates as the novel progresses. Initially, Kevin was someone the other boys aspired to be like. However, slowly his friends began to come to the realization that Kevin was just an ordinary, average child just like them. Roddy Doyle presents Kevin such that it contributes to the realism of an average childhood in Ireland during the 1950s. Doyle uses anecdotes to introduce the characters in the play. ...read more.

Middle

These examples show how Kevin dominance is presented in the novel. Paddy also helped push and pull "Liam to the fire". Paddy's participation in this potentially dangerous action shows how Paddy wishes to be like Kevin and follows his actions without first considering what he is doing. On top of that, it also portrays the realistic nature of the boys and how they bully the children weaker than themselves. It is possible that due to Kevin's dominance, the other boys too wish to be dominant like him and thus exercise their dominance over the children weaker than themselves. Roddy Doyle establishes this early in the novel that Kevin is also very mischievous and loves to create trouble. The events of Kevin kicking "the fire" at Paddy and also claiming that "the main's coming" so that Sinbad would feel that he was in a risky situation are examples of how Kevin demonstrates his mischievous qualities. However, we can see that as the novel progresses, Kevin's dominance begins to deteriorate. ...read more.

Conclusion

As Paddy realizes how foolish and immature Kevin is, Paddy begins to mature and change his opinions on the activities he used to do with Kevin. When the group of boys use Ian's sister's doll like a voodoo doll, Kevin's imagination is presented to be not completely aligned with the group of boys' imagination, contrasting how it was at the beginning of the novel. The boys then disagree over the effectiveness of the voodoo doll and this disagreement emphasizes the deterioration of Kevin's dominance over the group of boys as they begin to make a stand against Kevin. At the end of the novel, however, Kevin is still seen as an instigator of trouble, still getting the boys to cry "boycott". He is therefore still seen as a relatively static character as his portrayal at the end of the novel is somewhat similar to his portrayal in the beginning. Roddy Doyle uses Kevin as a character who aids the development of Paddy's character and this successfully brings the plot forward, adding color to the story along the way. ...read more.

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