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Commentary on The Custody of the Pumpkin By P. G. Wodehouse

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The Custody of the Pumpkin By: P. G. Wodehouse The Custody of the Pumpkin is a story about Lord Emsworth; a Scottish Lord, who resides in Blandings Castle. The story begins on a morning like all others in Blandings Castle, with Lord Emsworth outside in his garden enjoying the atmosphere. Suddenly, he spots Freddie, one of his youngest sons sneaking around with a girl. The Lord's dream had always been that a young, eligible and somewhat wealthy girl would come along and sweep Freddie off his feet so that Freddie would be out of his way. Unfortunately, this girl did not meet his criteria and the Lord therefore took it into his own hands to keep her as far away from his son as possible. Lord Emsworth ended up firing his head gardener; Angus McAllister, because he would not get rid of the girl Freddie had become involved with, the girl who was McAllister's cousin. The Lord realized too late that he had fired the one man who was able to produce a pumpkin worthy of the first prize at the Shrewsbury Show, a prize never won by himself or any of his royal ancestors. The Lord's desire to win the first place prize for his pumpkin drove him to seek out McAllister and beg him to return to work as his head gardener. ...read more.


I hate how Lord Emsworth cares more about a pumpkin than his own son. The Lord went through so much trouble to make sure that his pumpkin was the best it could be while his non exist relationship with Freddie proved that he did not feel quite as strongly about family. The Lord cared so much about winning the pumpkin prize that he invested in it when he had completely given up on his son and was counting down the days when he would finally be rid of him. "One of his favourite dreams was of some nice, eligible girl, belonging to a good family, and possessing a bit of money of her own, coming along some day and taking Freddie off his hands; but his inner voice, more confident now than ever, told him that this was not she". When I first read that sentence, a thought belonging to Lord Emsworth, there was a spark of hope in me that maybe the father did care for his son after all. It appeared that he was simply a man with high standards who required nothing but the best for his son. I thought that maybe he had some compassionate however I did not agree with his standards as I found them materialistic and patronizing. ...read more.


"The Custody of the Pumpkin" is the longest short story we've read so far and it wasn't as thought provoking as previous stories have been; it was more direct and it's point seemingly straight forward. To be completely honest, I would not recommend this book to anyone because I cannot think of any specific category of people who might enjoy it. Lord Emsworth: Robert Barker: 1. low-class 2. useless 3. gardener Aggie Donaldson: 1. beatiful 2. young 3. cousin of Angus 4. play the saxophone 5. friendly Mr. Donaldson: 1. rich 2. lives in states 3. Dog- Biscuits company 4. likes Fredddie 5. friendly 6. modest 7. humble 8. respectful 9. helpful 10. tall 11. handsome 12. keen Sir Gregory: 1. gentleman 2. sportman 3. upper-class 4. loves gardening 5. kind 6. rival for Emsworth 7. has a brooding look 1. fluffy minded 2. amiable old gentleman 3. arrogant 4. upper-class 5. Ninth Earl of Emsworth 6. wealthy 7. loves gardening 8. elegant 9. protagonist 10. conceited 11. haughty 12. selfish 13. bossy Hon. Freddie: 1. son of Lord Emsworth 2. does not like loyalty 3. naughty 4. respectful 5. intelligent 6. young 7. smiling 8. different in morals, appearance Angus: 1. medium-height 2. red beard 3. honest 4. intelligent 5. passionate 6. cute 7. has a weird talking 8. respectful 9. faithful 10. helpful 11. patriot Beach: 1. servant 2. faithful 3. helpful 4. respectful ...read more.

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