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I shall be presenting my analysis of an extract in Much Ado About Nothing written by William Shakespeare. This extract takes place in Act 1, Scene 1, lines 119 to 163. It is situated right after Leonato invites Don, Claudio, and Benedick to be his guests

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Introduction

Good afternoon ladies and gentlemen. I am a lecturer from the University of China, and I shall be presenting my analysis of an extract in Much Ado About Nothing written by William Shakespeare. This extract takes place in Act 1, Scene 1, lines 119 to 163. It is situated right after Leonato invites Don, Claudio, and Benedick to be his guests during their visit, and Pedro ends before Don Pedro offers to arrange Claudio's marriage. This extract contains themes, characters and literary techniques which are vital in the construction of the play.The development of this extract assists in constructing the theme deception in the play. In the first half of the extract, deception is observed through Benedick and Claudio's exchange. When Claudio states, "Thou thinkest I am in sport: I pray thee tell me truly how thou likest her"( Line 131), audiences see that Claudio is unable to accept Benedick's opinion of Hero, which is nothing more than a short, dark, and small women. ...read more.

Middle

On the other hand, the theme of love is first established by this extract. This is seen in the first line, when Claudio's attraction for Hero is first revealed, "didst thou note the daughter of Signior Leonato?"(line 119) This is followed by Benedick implying his attraction for Beatrice, as seen when he says "were she not possessed with a fury.'(line 141) This extract introduces the two future couples and foretells the obstacles that need to be overcome in the future, giving the play its story. Audiences see these obstacles through Benedick's fear of being cheated on, "In faith, hath not the world one man but he will wear his cap with suspicion?"(line 146 to 147) The theme of love introduced by this extract helps plot these complications that will construct the play. ...read more.

Conclusion

"With no sauce that can be devised to it. I protest I love thee" (4.1.270). This extract depicts Benedick as a misogynist which is the side to him prior realising to his love for Beatrice. The use of irony demonstrates Benedick's love for Beatrice in a humorous and mocking manner. In addition to that, the first instance of wordplay on nothing and noting is first seen when Claudio says "Benedick, didst thou note the daughter of Signior Leonato?"(line 119) and Benedick replies "I noted her not; but I looked on her."(line 120) This dialog establishes the two meanings of note to audiences, which is to observe and study. The themes of deception and love are first established by this extract. While much about Benedick is revealed in his conversation with Claudio. The irony in this extract lays the groundwork for the theme of love whereas the wordplay on noting and nothing hints the basis for all the complications. ...read more.

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