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In Act 4 we see the return of Laertes following his fathers murder; his return is marred by the need for revenge

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Introduction

Derek Russell IB English 12 Flather Act 4 CSI - Your character In Act 4 we see the return of Laertes following his father?s murder; his return is marred by the need for revenge and anger thus creating an immediate character foil with Hamlet. Both Hamlet and Laertes are tasked with the job of revenging their slain father?s. Hamlet?s task is forced upon him where on the other hand Laertes chooses to avenge his father?s death. Laertes rushes into his revenge without thinking as he returns to Denmark only to prematurely threaten Claudius in his blind rage. ...read more.

Middle

On the other hand, Hamlet refuses to sacrifice his soul to kill Claudius as we see when Hamlet refuses to kill Claudius when he is praying in the church. Laertes acts based off his emotions and even swears revenge ?to the blackest Devil!? (4.5.133). This is again another extreme emotional response by Laertes. The blackest Devil could also metaphorically represent Claudius as Laertes will do and sacrifice almost anything to anyone in order to enact his revenge. In Hamlet?s case his plans are more thought out, Hamlet acts on his brain and ideas whereas Laertes reacts solely on emotion. ...read more.

Conclusion

Laertes is willing to kill without any thought behind it and this alone makes him much more aggressive than Hamlet. By having no ?conscience? or ?grace? Laertes is able to do just about anything he wants with no consequence that would harm him in any real way (4.5.129). Overall Hamlet and Laertes are clear character foils both are sons tasked with revenging their father?s deaths. Yet Laertes is motivated by rage and emotions and does not think before he acts, while Hamlet who is forced into avenging his father?s death thinks strategically and is much more thoughtful and cunning. ...read more.

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