• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

In the poem Carpet-weavers, Morocco by Carol Rumens, she uses figurative language and concrete imagery to create a shifting mood. Furthermore, the structure of the poem leads the readers to an emotional end

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Carpet-weavers, Morocco by Carol Rumens In the poem "Carpet-weavers, Morocco" by Carol Rumens, she uses figurative language and concrete imagery to create a shifting mood. Furthermore, the structure of the poem leads the readers to an emotional end (an epiphany). In stanza 1, Rumens establishes the positive, fairytale mood by using figurative language and visual imagery. In line one, the poet uses the metaphor "loom of another world." Which suggest that the poet isn't from that place because the loom is different, from another culture. Line 2 describes the Moroccan children's hair and dresses using visual imagery; "Their braids are oiled and black, their dresses bright." ...read more.

Middle

The metaphor "As the garden of Islam grows" could mean that Islam is growing in power or could mean that the picture the children are weaving is growing and maybe nearly finished. The poet uses the word "Islam" which gives the reader the impression that they are Muslims and are religious. Carol Rumens uses the word "lace" which is a visual imagery so the reader can visualize how it is done. The word "dark-rose veins" in the metaphor "dark-rose veins of the tree-tops." creates a dark and bloody mood which makes the tree seem lifeless and evil. In stanza 3, the mood has become sacred with the use of figurative language and imagery. ...read more.

Conclusion

effect of that is that we feel pity for the children because they have no innocence since they have to learn how to work and survive at such a young age. The writer uses alliteration of F and she also uses another metaphor "colours of all-that-will-be fly and freeze into the frame of all-that-was." Shows that their future hopes and dreams will which makes us feel sorry for then because they have been robbed of their childhood freedom. Every stanze has got 3 lines and every line has got a full stop at the end of it which shows that it is very factual and to the point. The second last line has an enjambment which makes it a long line and creates a flow. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our International Baccalaureate World Literature section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related International Baccalaureate World Literature essays

  1. Casualty is an elegy written by Irish poet and writer Seamus Heaney. It is ...

    or loses, and the players are always, tiresomely, endlessly, passing the ball to each member of the team in an attempt to score a goal against the other team-until, of course, they do. The assonance of the 'e' vowel sound and run-on lines found within the concluding lines of the

  2. The poem Ispahan Carpet written by Elizabeth Burge explores the cruel conditions the makers ...

    The pressing question of 'who can unravel the worlds weaving' makes the reader ask themselves who will be able to break this cycle, and stop allowing carpets to be manufactured in this cruel way. 'Unravel the worlds weaving' reveals the complexity of the problem that mirrors the complex patterns on the carpets themselves.

  1. In his poem, "Traveling through the Dark," William Stafford presents the reader with the ...

    Through this, Stafford illustrates the importance of symbolism and of the moment of hesitation. This is where Stafford is able to develop the character of the speaker, as the reader sees a more compassionate person for the wilderness. In deciding what to do with the deer, Stafford says "Beside that mountain road I hesitated."

  2. Elizabeth Burges poem Ispahan Carpet is an extended metaphor which aims to compare the ...

    The rope can be compared to a noose which is gradually rising along with snatching the life of the person within it. The feebleness and frailty of the girls has been described using words like "sallow" and their bones are compared to the "unsupported" and decrepit bones of birds.

  1. How and to what effect does the use of language empower Higgins and ...

    He tells her: ?Woman: cease this detestable boohooing instantly; or else seek the shelter of some other place of worship.... A woman who utters such depressing and disgusting sounds has no right to be anywhere-no right to live. Remember that you are a human being with a soul and the

  2. Night of the Scorpion is a poem by Nissim Ezekiel, in which the poet ...

    Here, the poet uses a sarcastic tone along with the word ?unreal?, which creates a tone of scepticism in this part of the poem. There is more repetition in the line ?my mother twisted through and through? which further brings out the poet?s scepticism as he seems to be ?exaggerating? the events taking place.

  1. Commentary on "Wuthering Heights"

    This all was terrible, poor Mr. Earnshaw were getting beaten up in a savage way. Isabella witnessing all this ran to get Joseph who came down saying ?'What is ther to do, now? what is ther to do, now?? which shows us that Joseph thought there is no use now

  2. Ispahan Carpet by Elizabeth Burge describes the poets visit in Persia as she examines ...

    This can be seen in the last stanza, with the metaphor ?my swollen hands are gentle in the greenstick shoulder?. Metaphorically, the swollen hand would refer to the poets being powerless as she is unable to help. The readers could perceive this as a symbolic act of kindness.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work