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In the poem Carpet-weavers, Morocco by Carol Rumens, she uses figurative language and concrete imagery to create a shifting mood. Furthermore, the structure of the poem leads the readers to an emotional end

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Introduction

Carpet-weavers, Morocco by Carol Rumens In the poem "Carpet-weavers, Morocco" by Carol Rumens, she uses figurative language and concrete imagery to create a shifting mood. Furthermore, the structure of the poem leads the readers to an emotional end (an epiphany). In stanza 1, Rumens establishes the positive, fairytale mood by using figurative language and visual imagery. In line one, the poet uses the metaphor "loom of another world." Which suggest that the poet isn't from that place because the loom is different, from another culture. Line 2 describes the Moroccan children's hair and dresses using visual imagery; "Their braids are oiled and black, their dresses bright." ...read more.

Middle

The metaphor "As the garden of Islam grows" could mean that Islam is growing in power or could mean that the picture the children are weaving is growing and maybe nearly finished. The poet uses the word "Islam" which gives the reader the impression that they are Muslims and are religious. Carol Rumens uses the word "lace" which is a visual imagery so the reader can visualize how it is done. The word "dark-rose veins" in the metaphor "dark-rose veins of the tree-tops." creates a dark and bloody mood which makes the tree seem lifeless and evil. In stanza 3, the mood has become sacred with the use of figurative language and imagery. ...read more.

Conclusion

effect of that is that we feel pity for the children because they have no innocence since they have to learn how to work and survive at such a young age. The writer uses alliteration of F and she also uses another metaphor "colours of all-that-will-be fly and freeze into the frame of all-that-was." Shows that their future hopes and dreams will which makes us feel sorry for then because they have been robbed of their childhood freedom. Every stanze has got 3 lines and every line has got a full stop at the end of it which shows that it is very factual and to the point. The second last line has an enjambment which makes it a long line and creates a flow. ...read more.

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