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Shakespeare makes precise use of imagery to emphasise guilt

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Introduction

Guilt is the feeling that controls the senses and punishes the mind. In the famous play Macbeth, the author William Shakespeare stimulates the senses with both blood imagery and hallucinations. Shakespeare makes precise use of imagery to emphasise guilt. Shakespeare uses blood imagery to dramatically exaggerate guilt within the play. Firstly, Lady Macbeth's enormous sense of guilt provokes her to smell blood on her hands. While sleep walking, Lady Macbeth says, "Here's the smell of blood still: all the perfumes / Of Arabia will not sweeten this little hand. Oh!" (V.i.48-49). The blood portrays the odour of guilt since the scent strongly appeals to the sense of smell. Lady Macbeth's hands possess the endless scent of blood causing the perfumes unable to eliminate the odour. By differentiating the sickening smell of blood to the sweetness of all Arabian perfumes, Shakespeare exaggerates the sense of blame Lady Macbeth feels. ...read more.

Middle

The blood is the guilt that Macbeth feels after committing the deed of murdering the king. The blood on Macbeth's hands is of such great amount that no quantity of purity can wash the stain of guilt away. In addition, by reddening green seas with only Macbeth's bloody and guilty hands, the color of blood is significantly dominating over red's contradictory color green. Moreover, the reddening of water closely refers to the God's great powers in Exodus 7:20. "And he lifted up the staff and struck the water that was in the Nile ... and all the water that was in the Nile was turned into blood"1. The reddening of water is the power of God, yet because of Macbeth's incredible guilt, the blood on Macbeth's hands could incarnadine not only the Nile, but all of Neptune's oceans. In conclusion, Blood establishes the imagery Shakespeare uses to magnify guilt. ...read more.

Conclusion

..." (II.i.33-37). The dagger is a visual sight that Shakespeare uses to shows Macbeth's guilt haunting him before his crime. The realist handle and Macbeths desire to grasp it quivers the sense of touch. The dagger makes Macbeth's guilt extremely realistic and emphasises how his guilt is already on his mind, however, not yet on his senses. Since Macbeth feels guilt prior the crime, the emphasis is now put onto the guilt Macbeth feels after the deed. The Ghost of Banquo Haunts Macbeth's sight for Macbeth is guilty of his death. Macbeth openly says to the court, "Here had we now our country's honoured roof'd, / Where the grac'd person of our Banquo present;" (III.iv.40-41). The ghost of Banquo haunts Macbeth's sight for Macbeth is guilty of his death. The ghost emphasis guilt because it haunts only Macbeth and because of the irony and guilt Macbeth feels, the ghost of Banquo sits only in Macbeth's seat. William Shakespeare uses superb imagery and exquisite language to emphasis guilt within the play. In Macbeth, blood and hallucination imagery coexist to powerfully provoke the five senses. ...read more.

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