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The Wild Geese

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The Road to Germany Part 1 Jack Tomlinson A few days after the incident at the pond I began packing for the journey ahead to Germany. I knew I wanted to leave, but a part of me didn't want to leave just yet. This troubled me initially, well at least until I decided to walk past that particular house. The ship left later that day at 7 pm to Singapore. It would be a few weeks travel, I couldn't remember. From there I would take another ship to Cairo, Egypt. That would take much longer of a journey, a few months actually. From there I would travel to Al Iskandariyah, where I would take another ship to Genova, Italy. Finally, I would travel north until reaching Germany. By the time I was finished packing I realized it was 2 pm. I knew I would need some entertainment for the long journey ahead. ...read more.


The boat departed shortly afterwards, at about 7:30 pm. I unpacked my things and decided to take a walk around the boat. I walked around the living quarters for a while, hoping to find something interesting to look at. Nothing had seemed out of the ordinary, so I went outside. I walked to the front of the ship and sat there on a bench. It was amazing to think that I was actually leaving Japan for an entirely different world. One I had never actually seen before. The sun was setting on the horizon. The sun was guiding me to my destination, to a new beginning. I sat there for an about an hour when it started getting cold and I was getting hungry. So I went to the eating quarters to eat something. I browsed the menu to find something that might fit my tastes. I was quite hungry so I decided to get the kaiseki meal. It consisted of miso soup and three other side dishes. ...read more.


I was amazed at the sight of it. The lake was beautiful, lily pads covered the surface. The local vegetation had surrounded the lake; it was truly an amazing sight. Strangely, the lake had reminded me so much of the lake in Japan, where I killed that goose. Fate had guided me to that lake, perhaps to remind me of home. I stood there for hours staring at the endless abyss which was the lake. Eventually, something caught my attention, in the corner of my eye I saw a flock of geese coming into the lake. I actually began freaking out and left the sanctuary immediately. I had no idea what had actually happened. Apparently, there actually weren't any geese, it was my imagination. I figured that it was probably just my mind�s way of playing tricks on me since I was getting bored. I then left the gardens and went back to the motel. I had something to eat and slept the rest of the day. That is enough for this part of my story, perhaps I will tell you more later. ...read more.

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