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Things Fall Apart Passage Commentary outline

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Introduction

This passage is particularly significant because it reveals Okonkwo?s hidden characteristics of being kind, emotional and non-superstitious through his actions when he took care of Ezinma during her fever. Though Okonkwo does not normally show his emotions, this passage reveals his hidden fondness to Ezinma (the soft side that he did not want to show) Takes great care of Ezinma when the others said her sickness is nothing but a fever Shows his affection to Ezinma- against his usual high value of manliness, where a man should not show his soft side/against his usual tendency to hide his soft side. Sacrifices to go into the bush at night to pick up medicine for Ezinma Night- evil spirits/terrified by the people in the clan He ...read more.

Middle

?Okonkwo returned from the bush carrying on his left shoulder a large bundle of grass and leaves, roots and barks of medicinal trees and shrubs.? ignores the superstition, insist that medicine is more helpful- chooses the best for Ezinma, not blindly following the beliefs Okonkwo is declarative to Ekwefi, though very demanding, but it?s only out of his affection to Ezinma. He gives harsh orders to Ekwefi, but they are only to help Ezinma. ?Give me the pot. And leave the child alone!?- wants to take care of Ezinma himself Declarative- shows his care of Ezinma Very impatient with Ekwefi when she mistook the proportion of the medicine pot roared at her- anger ?roar?- metaphor comparing Okonkwo to lion- suggests Okonkwo?s violence at the time, and also anxiety He uses anger to hide his fear that Ezinma might die from the sickness. ...read more.

Conclusion

This passage is particularly significant because it reveals Okonkwo?s hidden characteristics of being kind, emotional and non-superstitious through his actions when he took care of Ezinma. Throughout the excerpt, Chinua provides different perspectives of Okonkwo?s character, and essentially, deep inside, he is soft and emotional just like his father. This is shown when he reveals his fondness to Ezinma when she was sick; and when Okonkwo raged to Ekwefi out of his worry about Ezinma?s sickness. Okonkwo is also described to be non-superstitious in the excerpt through his actions of going out into the bush at night to collect medicinal plants to cure Ezinma, which is greatly terrified by the villagers. ...read more.

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