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how does nutrients affect sports

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Introduction

How does nutrition affect sport Nutrition for Sport and Exercise Science In this assignment, I will look at each nutrient individually. I will firstly analyse their functions and how they relate to sport. I will secondly analyse their source and how this also relates to sport. I will finally relate the structure of carbohydrate, proteins, lipids and water to their function within the human body with respect to sport and exercise. Carbohydrates Carbohydrates primary function is to provide the body with the energy it needs in our daily lives. Carbohydrates provides up to 80% of our total bodies chemical potential energy. It is therefore essential that the body takes in this valuable nutrient because without it our body would have very little energy. Energy is also essential in sport, without energy are body wouldn't be able to function as well as its potential. An athlete must have a high level of carbohydrate intake so that they can meet the demands of the sport. Different sports require different levels. A marathon runner needs to have a very high level of carbohydrate so that they have enough energy throughout the whole race. Marathon runners may often have a carbohydrate overload. This means that they take in more carbohyrate than the RDA. This overload of carbohydrate will provide them with a steady release of energy. There are three main different types of carbohydrate. ...read more.

Middle

It isn't recommended that a sports athlete intakes these during sports, however they can intake these an hour before exercise in order to give it time to be broken down into monosaccharide. They can also consume them after sports. Disaccharides are made from two monosaccharide molecules. They also require the body to break them down. Although the process of breaking them down is only small, it is still not recommended that an athlete consumes them during sport. They are best used an hour before the exercise or sports event, so they can be quickly broken down and used. Monosaccharides are the smallest of the carbohydrates and are composed of a single sugar molecule. An athlete is able to take these in during sports as the body doesn't need to break them down. They can be absorbed straight into the blood. This structure is perfect for consuming during sport as it can be quickly absorbed without the body having to supply energy in order to break it down. This means that the energy saved from breaking the carbohydrate down can be used to increase the athlete's performance. Protein Proteins are essential within the body. They help to produce new cells within the body, they help to repair damaged tissue and they help the body to grow. The great majority of the body uses proteins to build the structure it needs. ...read more.

Conclusion

Having this balanced diet is essential for sports athletes. If they don't have the right balance in their diet then their body can't produce the structures it needs. The consequences are that the cells won't be able to be produced as fast and healing the body will take longer. A balanced diet of protein is therefore essential to meet the demands of sport. In this assignment, I will look at each nutrient individually. I will firstly analyse their functions and how they relate to sport. I will secondly analyse their source and how this also relates to sport. I will finally relate the structure of proteins to their function within the human body with respect to sport and exercise. Lipids Lipids are otherwise known as fats. Aswell as carbohydrates fats are used in the body as a source of energy. Fats are also essential for growth. Sports players have to have an acceptable level of fat although to much can be damaging towards the athletes health however, different athletes have to have different levels of fat depending on their chosen sport. Fats are stored in a number of various places within the body. Fats can be stored in the yellow marrow, found within the ends of the long bones. Fats are also found in a thin layer underneath the skin and surrounding some of the organs within the body. The layer of fat surrouding the body also acts as a layer of insulation to keep heat in. Water http://www.eatwell.gov.uk/healthydiet/foodforsport/sportnexercise/ ...read more.

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