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The purpose of this lab is to predict the molecular and ionic geometries of the species listed using Lewis dot structures, and find if the molecule has resonance structures.

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Introduction

Molecular Bonding Lab I. Purpose: The purpose of this lab is to predict the molecular and ionic geometries of the species listed using Lewis dot structures, and find if the molecule has resonance structures. Variables: ==>Dependent Variable: The dependant variables in the lab are the Lewis Dot structures for the compounds. ==>Controlled Variables: The controlled variable in the lab is the formula for the compounds. ==>Independent Variable: The independent variable in the lab is the molecular structure. II. Hypothesis: When given a chemical formula, I will be able to show their Lewis-Dot structure and construct their molecular model. When I do this, I will then be able to determine if it is polar, show it's molecular geometry, bond angles, and if the compound has symmetry or not. When gathering all of this information, I will be able to determine the chemical properties of each molecule. III. Materials: 1. Lab 2. Textbook Chemistry 3. Molecular model kits i. Wooden balls ii. Wooden sticks iii. Metal springs 4. Minerals (unknowns) i. Pyrite (cube) ii. Fluorite iii. Dolomite iv. Pyrite (pyritohedron) v. Zircon vi. Aragonite vii. Quartz viii. Orthoclase ix. Calcite IV. Procedure: Part A. Wooden Ball Molecular Models 1. ...read more.

Middle

5. Fourth column- create graphical representation for each mineral and then color each. V. Data Collection: ==>Molecular formulas used: 1. CH4 2. CH2Cl2 3. CH4O 4. H2O 5. H3O+ 6. HF 7. NH3 8. H2O2 9. N2 10. P4 11. C2H4 12. C2H2Br2 13. C2H2 14. SO2 15. SO42- 16. CO2 17. SCN- 18. NO3- 19. HNO3 20. C2H4Cl2 ==>Valence-electrons calculations: 1. CH4 = 4+1(4) = 8 2. CH2Cl2 = 4+1(2) + 7(2) = 20 3. CH4O = 4+1(4) + 6 = 14 4. H2O = 1(2) + 6 = 8 5. H3O+ = 1(3) + 6 = 9 6. HF = 1 + 7 = 8 7. NH3 = 5 + 1(3) = 8 8. H2O2 = 1(2) + 6(2) = 14 9. N2 = 5(2) = 10 10. P4 = 5(4) = 20 11. C2H4 = 4(2) + 1(4) = 12 12. C2H2Br2 = 4(2) + 1(2) + 7(2) = 24 13. C2H2 = 4(2) + 1(2) = 10 14. SO2 = 6 + 6(2) = 18 15. SO42- = 6 + 6(4) = 30 16. CO2 = 4 + 6(2) = 16 17. SCN- = 6 + 4 + 5 = 15 18. ...read more.

Conclusion

When gathering all of this information, I will be able to determine the chemical properties of each molecule." was correct. The statement that I made was very correct but at the time of the hypothesis I did not imagine the clarity that the models possessed and the knowledge that would come out of a few simple and harmless experiments, such as this. Thus looking back I feel that I could have written a more complex and informative hypothesis. When asked to classify the outcomes and pieces of the experiment as qualitative or quantitative I came up with this. The quantitative aspects of this lab have a wide range. One of them would be the calculation of the energy series charges and how the calculations reveled the bond angles. The qualitative data for this lab would include the diagrams and the colors that were recorded during part C. It would be very intriguing if we were to take the molecular models to the 21st century and have developed the molecules on the computer with CG drawn animation of the exact formation of the molecule. This could be followed up with the development of computer hypothesized chemical reactions. The experiment was quite informative of the atomic world and how it works. It also brought about a realization of how much work and chemistry really goes into the everyday viewing of bonding. ...read more.

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