• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Analyse the extent to which Poon's theory relates to the changing nature of tourism in the Costa Brava.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

1.0 Introduction Poon (1994) suggests a change in tourism demand; identifying a shift from old tourism, characterised by 'mass, standardized, and rigidly packaged holidays', towards a 'flexibility, segmented and more authentic new tourism experience'. This report aims to analyse the extent to which Poon's theory relates to the changing nature of tourism in the Costa Brava. 2.0 The demand for tourism Spain first became a major destination for 'mass tourism' between the 1960's and 70's, following the industry boom and by the 1990s Germany, UK and Spain accounted for over three quarters of visitors (Buswell, 1996). In 2000, Spain was the third most visited country in the world, attracting more than 48,500,000 visitors per annum (WTO 2000). New technological advancements in the airline industry, cheap oil, standardisation of product and use of economies of scale drove down the price of holidays even further, and Spain was able to capitalise on the increased desire for sun-lust tourism. As Gomez and Sinclair (in Barke et al., 1996, p.67) illustrate: 'between 1951 and 1990 most tourists visited the country during the summer months to take advantage of the sun and the beaches'. However, a study carried out by Gonz´┐Żlez and Moral (1996, p. 747) found that the clear seasonal fluctuations in demand identified in the mid 90's have since become more homogeneous throughout the year, suggesting that people are no longer visiting the Costa Brava simply for the sun, lending credence to Poon's theory of a change towards new tourism. ...read more.

Middle

The increased scope in objectives and motivations of tourist visitors to the Costa Brava has meant it is imperative to promote the right combination of elements to the right market. Uncovering consumer interests, patterns of demand and buyer behaviour through the use of market research, will enable focused target markets and niches to be developed thus enabling the Spanish tourist board to refine their targets and develop specific means to achieve truly individual marketing (Pitta 1998). The Spanish tourist board needs to initiate fundamental changes to their marketing strategy; an emphasis on key principles such as, environmental focus, development of tourism as a lead sector, strengthening distribution channels, integrating information technology systems and the need to build a dynamic private sector have to be incorporated. Once achieved, the Spanish tourist board can begin to differentiate itself from the competition and market its provinces such as the Costa Brava as a sustainable tourist destination with a focus toward both sun seeking mass tourists and individuals in search of culture and natural heritage. 6.0 Key Problem and Issues: Section 4.0 highlighted the positive impacts derived from increased tourism; in contrast, this section examines the negative issues and key problems faced by the Costa Brava as a result of the rapidly increasing demand for tourism: 6.1 Economic Impacts: It is true that tourism has increased the amount of money coming into the Costa Brava, however, the region has been unable ...read more.

Conclusion

The 1960's aim of economic growth has now been replaced by concern for the environment and restructuring of the local economy and tourism product. 'Legislation...which would effectively limit the growth of the accommodation product' (Prat 1996) is needed to limit the deterioration to the environment. In order to develop and manage sustainable tourism in Costa Brava, private sector businesses, local and national governments, and host communities, must work together in the planning, monitoring, assessment and cautious development of further tourism products. 8.0 Conclusion: The nature of tourism is changing; Poon's theory of old and new tourism is relevant to the Costa Brava, and does provide a useful basis from which to analyse and relate trends and changes in demand. It should however be said that the model is not entirely conclusive and fails to take into account the fact that an increase in demand for new tourist attractions and motivators does not eliminate the need or demand for the traditional sun-seeking tourist facilities, and perhaps Poon's theory should consider the possibility that both old and new tourism may continue to co-exist, even in the same location. For many, price remains the primary consideration when choosing a holiday destination, and until this changes, there will always be a market for mass tourism. It should therefore be noted that in order to optimize the number of visitors, local tourist boards must take both old and new tourism into account when planning tourist destinations, and should be aware of both markets when promoting the region. 9. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our University Degree Tourism, Transport & Travel section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related University Degree Tourism, Transport & Travel essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Kearsley (2002) has said that "if this film (Lord of the Rings) achieves half ...

    4 star(s)

    It is no longer possible to sustain a fragmented tourist industry; all areas must work in partnership with one and another. The portfolio briefing, 1999, highlights some of the problems facing New Zealand's tourism industry. Tourism markets are becoming more dynamic, customized and unpredictable due to changes in customer behaviour caused by economic, social and technological change.

  2. Project Report on Tourism and Hotel Industry in India

    3. Government does not allow the capacity of existing airports to increase and private and foreign operators are not given clearances to operate in the country. Opportunity 1. As the tourism industry expands the airline industry is also in for a boom. 2. Development and upgradation of the present airports 3.

  1. Sports Tourism, Football hooligans

    Due to football hooligans fighting in stadiums, bosses have introduced seating plans to make sure people have a place to sit and this is trying to secure the football ground a bit more by trying stop riots, also by adding CCTV cambers in and around the football stadiums is trying

  2. investigating the tourism industry

    usually one of the first items of household expenditure to be cut out. An example is in the early 1990's recession in the UK led to a decrease in the overseas holidays, with consumer confidence low due to the fears of unemployment and a fall in house prices.

  1. Investigating Travel and Tourism

    Due to the improvement in road networks and the increasing numbers in car ownership has been a major factor in providing access to the countryside for leisure trips. For the residence living in towns and cities, the countryside is usually a short trip.

  2. Hospitality and Tourism Business Strategies Planning Essay

    In addition, all the room available are equipped and designed for disabled persons. All bedrooms have the in suite bathrooms with the beds with wide entry doors for ease of access. The toilets in the bathroom are provided with the grab rails and availability of the wet rooms is the attraction of this hotel.

  1. The Master Plan for Sustainable Tourism Development in Jamaica

    The value of this master plan is to widen the sense of ownership of the industry from large to small business, from non-governmental organizations to local communities who may get benefit in tourism. There are not one size fits all frameworks for a tourism development to suit all circumstances (Ruhanen and Whitford, 2010).

  2. The development of tourism and its importance to the economic development of Kenya

    a way of creating jobs opportunities, generating better standards of living by rising up regional development issues. Tourism has been greatly summarized by WTO: "Tourism enriches individuals, families, communities and all the world." Tourism intervenes to all continents globally in a very positive way.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work