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Contemporary Brand Management Assignment: Guinness

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Introduction

Contemporary Brand Management Assignment: Guinness Contents: 1.0 Terms of Reference P 3 2.0 The Brand 2.1 Brands P4 2.2 Background of Guinness P4 3.0 Brand Positioning P6 3.1 Guinness's Positioning Statement P7 4.0 Brand Analysis P8 4.1 Brand Pyramid for Guinness P10 5.0 Special Interest P12 6.0 Brand Management Recommendation P14 7.0 Bibliography P15 8.0 Appendices P18 1.0 Terms of Reference I have been asked to produce a report which identifies the characteristics of a successful brand, critically analyses the brand using theoretical concepts and evaluate consumer relationships with the brand and brands in general. Also I have been asked to produce a recommendation to enhance the brand's consumer image and discuss why brand management is important within organisations. 2.0 The Brand 2.1 Brands Brands are often defined as "It is the emotional and psychological relationship" (Ehret, 2009) that you as a business create between your product or service and the targeted customer. A brand is made up of many concepts such as brand name, identity and experience. The experience is an "individual audience member's experience as he or she interacts with the brand" (Landa, 2006) so basically it is the psychological feelings created from using a product or service under a certain brand. These feelings can be affected by certain areas of the branding process, for example the colour of the logo or packaging can stimulate differing moods, whereas the quality of the product or service provided can increase a person's perception or attachment towards the brand. In the case of my chosen brand Guinness, the colours of the advertising campaign and the bottle the drink comes in reflect that of the drink itself, acting as a subtle reminder to potential customers. A brand differs from the product or the company because it has intangible benefits that add to the product's functional or tangible benefits. This creates an added value which is "a relative concept that enables customers to make a purchase on the basis of superiority over competing brands" (de Chernatony, 2006). ...read more.

Middle

Guinness is too short a name to have negative or positive connotations, but it still has the link with the heritage of the product, which in this case is positive and definitely distinctive. As with the name, the logo and tag line are simple so as to be memorable. The logo, a golden harp (see appendix 2) represents the Irish heritage as it is a mirror image of the harp of Brian Boru which is on the Irish coat of arms. Guinness's tag line "good things come to those who wait" accentuates the need to savour the drink for its flavour rather than just to feel the effects of the alcohol. This tag line is short and uncomplicated which adds to the stylish, classy identity created by Guinness. Guinness has utilised the appearance of the product to help create the style for the brand, effectively persuading customers that Guinness is the brand for them. The majority of Guinness's identity is a reflection of the product, for example the design of the websites and adverts having a black background with a white border at the top, as well as the packaging which are a black bottle or can with the cream label and logo. Guinness also uses gold and cream font and text to emphasise the richness of the stout and create perceptions of the quality that will come with the product. Not only does the packaging design help to increase customer perceptions of the product but it also helps customers differentiate Guinness from its competitors. Upshaw (1995) states that ""the identity is the whole fabric of how a product or service is seen by its constituencies" therefore Guinness needed to create a design and style that would increase the positives of the brand, such as the flavour and the superiority and therefore make it more appealing to customers. Brand Image is described as something that "encompasses both brand identity and the attributes and characteristics that people ascribe to the brand (Biel,1991)" (cited Admap, 2003) ...read more.

Conclusion

According to a study cited by Carrigan & Attalla (2001) "Most respondents agreed that social responsibility was not an important consideration in their purchasing behaviour" therefore the ethical perceptions of a brand does not matter to consumers. However I feel that due to the image congruence hypothesis (Heath & Scott 1998) mentioned earlier on in the report and ideas like it, people will feel some change regarding a brand as they do not want to be associated with unethical brands, for example Nike with its involvement in Sweat shops. I feel that ethics do have an impact, subconsciously, on the perceptions people make in their minds about brands. With this in mind, it is therefore an advantage for Guinness to have a fairly ethical brand. 6.0 Brand Management Recommendation My idea to enhance Guinness's consumer image is to use celebrity endorsement. Celebrity endorsement has influenced brand recognition, recall and purchasing intentions of customers as well as increasing the positivity of the endorsed brand. In 1995 for the launch of the "Anticipation" campaign the television advertisement contained Joe McKinney, an Irish actor, waiting for the perfect pint of Guinness. This advertising campaign was highly successful for Guinness however it was the only celebrity endorsed campaign, which was over 10 years ago. Therefore I feel that it is time to make use of this technique. Research suggests that celebrity endorsement leads to greater recall of the brand and that "celebrity endorsement can influence perceived product quality and uniqueness" (Dean, 1999). My suggestion is to use an Irish celebrity whose personality matches that created by the brand pyramid, a distinguished actor which will mirror the quality of the product as well as the Irish heritage, for example Pierce Brosnan or Stuart Townsend. I feel that either of these actors will help to enhance the brands consumer image, especially seeing as they are stylish, cultured people who will only add to the personality of the brand. As for future brand activity, a campaign could be created that includes different actors of the same calibre. 7. ...read more.

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