• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The role of expert and lay knowledge in understanding and managing risk.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

´╗┐The role of expert and lay knowledge in understanding and managing risk. 1. Introduction. 2. Risk. 3. Expert knowledge. 4. Lay knowledge 5. Conclusion. 6. References Introduction. This report looks at the concept of risk which for the purpose of the report ?is a state in which there is a possibility of known danger/harm which if avoided may lead to benefits? (Carter and Jordan, 2009, p.59) and examines ways in which different areas of knowledge are developed and what role they play in helping people to understand and manage risk. Risk 1. Risk is ?is a state in which there is a possibility of known danger/harm which if avoided may lead to benefits? (Carter and Jordan, 2009, p.59). 2. An activity that has the potential to put the user at risk of danger/harm 3. All activities that have risks have an element of doubt; to be exposed to a risk is to be exposed to the chance that it may cause an element of danger/harm to one?s self. Beck?s account of Risk society (1989) claims that we are changing from an industrial society to one where, 1. ...read more.

Middle

No one can tell by looking at the soil whether it?s poisonous or not, but there was also a government level in, one might say, a society wide attempt to manage a particular risk in a particular way. (A risky world?, 2009, track 2). The case study into the soil on the allotment raises the issues as follows, 1. Knowledge in relation to risk is difficult to produce as choices and assumptions are used in creating knowledge for example; which test to use. 2. Testing produced differing results and uncertainty. 3. Scientific debates on how best to assess risk and expert knowledge is not a unified body of work causing more uncertainty. 4. During testing complications that occur are not made public with the results and the public are left to make sense of the results such as the gardeners on the allotments of which many more readily accepted the results of the second test. 5. Risk becomes difficult for both expert and lay knowledge to assess. To examine further the production of knowledge in relation to risk at epidemiology using statistical techniques to reveal patterns of health within a population by producing probabilistic association between environmental factors and illness. ...read more.

Conclusion

Davidson et used two examples of this and had the effect of neutralising the messages contained in public health advice. 1. ?Uncle Norman? in an at risk category and avoiding simple health advice became sick. 2. ?The last person? despite following health advice and still became sick Non experts make decisions based on their own judgment however lay epidemiology is considered comparable with expert epidemiology and although conflict often occurs between the expert and lay opinions they do often have grounds to engage each other for example it is important to understand lay knowledge in creating effective public health messages. Conclusion Risk is subjective both expert and lay opinions are useful in determining if the risk is worth taking. Beck?s risk society is evident in both case studies and risk knowledge is created by the expert field of epidemiology, however lay knowledge produced by the public is at individual level and each individual will interpret it for themselves leading them to question the public health advice. Each test or expert piece of knowledge can be contested as in the two allotment soil tests both had different results and outcomes that lead to the individual making up their own mind in which advice to follow. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our University Degree Human Resource Management section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related University Degree Human Resource Management essays

  1. What is Knowledge Management?

    Angostura Ltd. is a perfect example of a company that manages an effective knowledge management system. The company consistently capatilizes on research and development techniquies that sets them apart from their competitors. Taking into consideration their famous Angostura Bitters The "secret" was developed in 1824 by Dr.

  2. Project risk management.

    Question1: Determine the areas of competence required for the effective execution of the planned project and discuss to what extent these seem to have been foreseen in the project document. There are eight competence areas for effective execution of project activities as discussed below.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work