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A Personal Rationale For Geography In The School Curriculum

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Introduction

Title: A Personal Rationale For Geography In The School Curriculum Geography is an exciting, all encompassing discipline that allows one to understand "the earth and everything in, under, over and on it. It is reminders of yesterday, realities of today, and dreams of tomorrow" (Walford, 2001�. p7), but at a time of great change in geographical education (Fisher & Binns, 2000), will future national curriculums see a tomorrow for a subject whose teachings date back to the time of the Greeks (Walford, 2001�; Walford, 2001�). To contemplate such a thought as I stand at the threshold of my career, as a geography teacher fills me with great concern. However, it is not a thought to be rubbished, as a large variety of issues facing the subject, could see it squeezed to the outer echelons of the national curriculum (Binns, 1997), or perhaps out of existence altogether (Walford, 2001�). There is no doubt that the subject of geography, as we know it now is enduring a difficult and uncertain time within the school curriculum. However, I believe, the subject is and will dominate the rapidly changing world of the twenty-first century. This subsequently leaves just one unanswered question, will policy makers be able to act fast enough to halt the subject's downward spiral. ...read more.

Middle

This trip came during a year ten unit of work looking at coastal management. It followed work conducted by the year in school, into the types of sea management defenses that they may find along the coast. Then once out in the field the pupils went about proving and/or disproving the prescribed hypotheses by carrying out a series of transects. Such an activity ensured that the pupils developed a range of skills appropriate to their ability, whilst allowing them to develop their understanding of coastal defenses. In conjunction with this achievement the pupils were also encouraged to think about the places they had visited in order to allow them to develop a sense of place. This was carried out by asking the pupils to write a Haiku, a short Japanese poem, it provided the pupils with the opportunity to think about, describe and express their feels about the places they had visited. Following our visit future lessons explored what it was that pupils had found out and understood from their work along the coast. However, despite the success of this outdoor learning experience in reflection I fear that the emphasis on quantification, through the need to prove and/or disprove a hypothesis may have at times, "cut off the pupil from his or her feelings for the environment" (Lambert and Balderstone, 2000. ...read more.

Conclusion

draw from their own experiences in the discussions allowing them to form opinions regarding this topic and share them with the class. Furthermore, the study of such issues is important that pupils have the opportunity to satisfy the basic requirements of the subject. This allows them to improve their geographical understanding, whilst increasing their curiosity for the world in which we live today. By doing so we allow students to develop their geographical enquiry, geographical communication and cultural understanding and diversity, these are all key concepts that are some of the fundamental ideas in geography which underlie geographical work at Key Stage 3. They are the framework of geography in which students will gradually understand them better as they study the geographical topic such as Migration. I believe it is important that pupils understand these concepts in order to deepen and broaden their knowledge, skills and understanding. Thus ending with a statement I began with; there is no doubt that the subject of geography, as we know it now is enduring a difficult and uncertain time within the school curriculum. However, as described above, the subject is and will dominate the rapidly changing world of the twenty-first century. This subsequently leaves just one unanswered question, will policy makers be able to act fast enough to halt the subject's downward spiral. ...read more.

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