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Impact of ICT on education.

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Introduction

IMPACT OF ICT ON EDUCATION Classroom computers in the past In the very beginning computers were introduced to classrooms around 1986. Manor Gardens Primary School bought 4 Commodore computers for learners. A few parents had the responsibility for giving the learners computer lessons, because none of the teachers were trained to do this. Over time, the parents also trained some of the teachers, now it was the teacher's responsibility to train learners. However one of the teachers involved in this computer teaching found it a complete waste of time. The parents urged the school to obtain new technology, as the stuff they had was outdated, but there was not teaching programme to make this new technology useful. This equipment was expensive to maintain and broke down regularly. Computer lessons were not steady due to the amount of downtime. By the late eighties this equipment was no longer functional. The introduction of PC's in the early nineties was a HUGE success. Teachers used them for administrative purposes, and word processing made work much easier for teachers. The reason this launch was successful was because teachers got full training on how to use the applications effectively. ...read more.

Middle

This indicates that software such as MS Excel is used a lot less at home. ICT use for Science is virtually the same as Maths with just a few key differences. The levels of use of ICT in Science is lower than English and Maths, with 76% reporting never or hardly ever using ICT in their science lessons, 89% never or hardly ever use ICT for science related activities elsewhere in school, and 80% never or hardly use ICT at home. I think that if pupils in years 1 and 2 start using computers then once they reach junior school they will already have a basic understanding of how to use them, therefore at key stage 2 they can develop their knowledge and understanding. Once they reach secondary school their understanding will have developed, therefore allowing for further development. However in my experience there has been a negative effect against literacy because if I spell a word wrong on MS Word I just right click and choose the appropriate correct word, I do not think to see how it has been spelled. ...read more.

Conclusion

The student can then bring their PDA to school and with wireless technology send their work to their teacher to be marked. The teacher will then easily be able to mark the work and send it back to the students PDA within the same lesson. This means students will get their results back instantly. This method would also be a lot easier for teachers because there would be no paper involved so work would not be getting lost or ripped. Their records of the student's marks could be automatically updated so this would save a lot of time. PDA's wireless technology means the transfer of documents would be quick and easy because you wouldn't have to mess about connecting wires to each PDA etc. I think PDA's for each student and teacher would be a great idea because it would mean everyone would be more organised. Nobody would need paper because the teacher could just send the work to the students PDA and when the work is complete the student could just send the work back. However if students lose their PDA then it would cost quite a bit to replace them and this even might increase bullying because students may get their PDA robbed etc. Websites http://news.bbc.co.uk www.becta.org.uk http://students2.humsci.und.ac.za/200297404/History.htm ?? ?? ?? ?? 2 ...read more.

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