• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10
  11. 11
    11
  12. 12
    12
  13. 13
    13
  14. 14
    14
  15. 15
    15
  16. 16
    16
  17. 17
    17
  18. 18
    18
  19. 19
    19
  20. 20
    20
  21. 21
    21
  22. 22
    22
  23. 23
    23
  24. 24
    24
  25. 25
    25
  26. 26
    26
  27. 27
    27
  28. 28
    28
  29. 29
    29
  30. 30
    30
  31. 31
    31
  32. 32
    32
  33. 33
    33
  34. 34
    34
  35. 35
    35
  36. 36
    36
  37. 37
    37
  38. 38
    38
  39. 39
    39
  40. 40
    40
  41. 41
    41
  42. 42
    42
  43. 43
    43
  44. 44
    44
  45. 45
    45
  46. 46
    46
  47. 47
    47
  48. 48
    48
  49. 49
    49
  50. 50
    50
  51. 51
    51
  52. 52
    52
  53. 53
    53
  54. 54
    54
  55. 55
    55
  56. 56
    56
  57. 57
    57
  58. 58
    58
  59. 59
    59
  60. 60
    60
  61. 61
    61
  62. 62
    62
  63. 63
    63
  64. 64
    64
  65. 65
    65
  66. 66
    66
  67. 67
    67
  68. 68
    68
  69. 69
    69
  70. 70
    70
  71. 71
    71
  72. 72
    72
  73. 73
    73
  74. 74
    74
  75. 75
    75
  76. 76
    76
  77. 77
    77
  78. 78
    78
  79. 79
    79
  80. 80
    80
  81. 81
    81
  82. 82
    82
  83. 83
    83
  84. 84
    84
  85. 85
    85
  86. 86
    86
  87. 87
    87
  88. 88
    88
  89. 89
    89
  90. 90
    90

Modeling complex phenomena: An investigation of two teaching approaches with fifth graders.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Modeling complex phenomena: An investigation of two teaching approaches with fifth graders. A dissertation submitted to the University of Manchester for the degree of MA in the Faculty of Humanities 2008 Christine Snow School of Education LIST OF CONTENTS Pages List of Tables......................................................................................4 List of Abbreviations.............................................................................5 Abstract............................................................................................6 Declaration........................................................................................7 Copyright Statement..............................................................................7 Introduction.......................................................................................8 Literature Review...............................................................................12 Introduction.............................................................................12 Models and modeling in general.....................................................12 Models in Science Education.........................................................14 Factors that influence modeling-based teaching..........................21 Constructivism................................................................21 Modeling tools................................................................22 Computer-based modeling in Science Education..................................23 Attending to learning styles when teaching science with different modeling approaches...............................................................................28 Development of Research questions................................................32 Methodology....................................................................................34 Introduction.............................................................................34 Methodological approach.............................................................34 Sample...................................................................................35 Data Collection.........................................................................35 Questionnaires: VAK test and previous knowledge......................35 Constructivism teaching approach..........................................37 Subject taught..................................................................37 Group meetings...............................................................38 Study's computer-based modeling tool....................................39 Data sources...................................................................41 - Observations........................................................41 - Group interviews...................................................42 Data Analysis...........................................................................43 Limitations..............................................................................44 Validity and Reliability...............................................................45 Ethical Issues...........................................................................46 Discussion and Analysis........................................................................47 Computer-based modeling approach group........................................47 Students' conversations......................................................49 Students' programming strategies..........................................54 Group interviews..............................................................56 Non-computer based modeling approach group ..................................59 Students' conversations and strategies.....................................60 Group interviews..............................................................62 Comparison between the two groups and Discussion.............................64 Conclusions......................................................................................71 References.......................................................................................74 Appendixes.......................................................................................83 Final Word Count: LIST OF TABLES Pages Stagecast Creator's Group...................................................................48 Group that worked with materials..........................................................59 LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS Dfes: Department of Education and Skills SC: Stagecast Creator VAK: Visual Auditory Kinesthetic ABSTRACT This is a qualitative study seeking to investigate two different modeling-based approaches in science education and how fifth graders, having their first experience on a modeling-based teaching environment, interact toward these approaches. The two approaches differ to the fact that one is based on a computer-based programming environment (Stagecast Creator) and the other is based on a non computer-based environment (models made with materials). Both approaches were designed having as a framework a constructivism approach, while students' interactions are observed through students' individual learning style (auditory, visual, and kinesthetic learners). The main purpose of the current study is to identify which of the two approaches can support better students' understandings when they are taught a scientific phenomenon, specifically how day and night occurs and how this depends on students' individual characteristics. ...read more.

Middle

So, the specific phenomenon even if it is a situation that happens every day, children are not aware of what causes it, since they can't make direct observations. Accordingly, the use of modeling approaches might be considered as a valuable procedure of gaining knowledge about the current phenomenon. Group meetings Two meetings were conducted with each group and each meeting lasted about one hour and a half. The meetings were accomplished in a room, where the appropriate equipment was settled before each meeting. Students of each group were separated in groups of two and each group was consisted from students with the same learning preference. Students in both groups during the learning process were working collaboratively. The group that was working with the computer-based modeling approach used three computers. The program that students were using in order to develop the model of day and night was Stagecast Creator. No one of the students had any previous experience with the specific modeling tool, so they took some tutorials before start creating their model. In addition, students that participated in the group that didn't include computer implementation were using materials in order to create the model, like spheres made of paper, presenting the earth and the Sun. I chose this kind of approach since materials are directly related with children's everyday experience and they have confidence in using them. Moreover, both approaches were appropriate for carrying out hands-on activities that are important for modeling and teaching (Dickinson et al, 1997) Both groups were taught with the same learning activities before creating the model with the modeling tools they should. The teaching procedures were enriched with the use of pictures, appropriate worksheets and videos that helped students clarify any misconceptions they had and help them acquire efficient knowledge about the phenomenon under study. Also, students were supported every time they had difficulties, since they didn't have any experience with this kind of modeling-based activities. ...read more.

Conclusion

In addition, students' individual characteristics seemed to be supported from different features of the two modeling approaches. Specifically, certain activities were helpful for some students with a specific learning style, while they ignored other activities. Therefore, the need for using a range of activities in a teaching approach that correspond to every learning style is highlighted. At this point it is important to be mentioned that gender differences, not strictly related with students' learning style were observed. Furthermore, the computer-based program that was used increased students' motivation since they received direct and continuous feedback that helped them revise their models. SC offered the ability to every student to use it according to his or her personal needs, since audio, images, animation and hands-on activities were available. On the other hand, students working with materials were likely to create their models with a specific way, since they didn't have many options. However, kinesthetic learners were collaborating more efficiently with the non computer-based approach since both students were able to interact with hands-on activities, while during the computer-based approach one of them was using the mouse. Even if findings from the current study can't be used in generalization for the student population, since it was a small-scale research, it is suggested that modeling-based approaches should be well designed in order to correspond to every students' individual needs. Still, it is recommend that apart from learning styles, other factors like gender and age should be investigated in order to see how they affect the modeling-based teaching in a science lesson. Further researchers might also find it useful to examine which modeling approach, a computer-based modeling approach or a modeling approach based on laboratory settings, can support better students on developing modeling skills that can use in novel situations. Moreover, further research could be conducted in order to study how students' experiences and confidence with computers or laboratory settings can affect two different modeling approaches similar with those of the present study. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our University Degree Education and Teaching section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related University Degree Education and Teaching essays

  1. Discuss the behaviourist and cognitive theories of learning. Evaluate the implication of each for ...

    If the praise was administered in private then the praise is labelled as intrinsic. Contrasting to classical conditioning, punishment and exclusion can be employed to modify a student's behaviour; withdrawing rewards and imposing punishments such as reprimand and exclusions are all negative reinforcers.

  2. Explain how practical Life Exercises in the home and Montessori school can provide the ...

    For a child to develop normally, he must gain control over his motor skills. To encourage this, the child is allowed to walk to the shelf himself and carry any material he wishes to work with and to return it when he is done with it.

  1. Special education needs. Within this essay it will critically analyse and evaluate the ...

    In order for all children to achieve we as a team ensure that children with Special Educational Needs have access to a broad, balanced curriculum which will ensure that it is appropriate to their needs. The current SENCO in our setting is Mrs Roberts.

  2. How the montessori directress assists the child in his psychic development.

    "They are an aid for the child who chooses them himself, takes possession of them, uses them and employs himself with them according to his own tendencies and needs and just as long as he is interested in them. In this way the objects become means of development".

  1. What is inclusive education?

    Furthermore, flexibility must be encouraged and teachers must be given professional development (Van Kraayanoord, 2003) which ensures that they take responsibility for all learning (including their own) (Allan, 2003). This essay has shown how inclusive education is not a straight forward process that can be implemented overnight.

  2. Describe the difference between the pre-normalised and normalised child.

    The three year old girl in Casa Dei Bambini that was engrossed in the knobbed cylinders was going through a sensitive period. She remained engrossed in the activity despite all the distractions going on around her. The sensitive period is a time of intense concentration and mental activity on developing

  1. Early Years Setting. This report is based on the wellbeing of children in my ...

    Although the document in appendix 1 doesn't mention children's rights it stresses the importance of children's needs and suggests "Each child needs to feel they matter to someone who is special to them and with whom they have formed an attachment, so that they have a loving, secure relationship.

  2. Languge Teaching Approaches Today and the Effectiveness of Communicative Language Teaching

    After 1o minutes, students are called randomly to read out their answers. At this point, the teacher's intention is to make sure students get the correct answers whereas their pronunciation is not heavily stressed. Then, students are asked to write the Malay translation of the passage in their exercise books.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work