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Select stimulus and show how you will use it to engender understanding of art through a series of planned activities

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Introduction

Select stimulus and show how you will use it to engender understanding of art through a series of planned activities Fruit is to be used as my stimulus to generate children's understanding of visual art within a series of three planned activities. Nature of the intended learning outcome: * To be able to record from first hand observation using monochrome pencils and coloured pens. * To make a simple drawing from previous artworks in order to make template for an appliqu� design. * To cut out the templates for their design. * To be able to make their appliqu�. In the three sessions the children will be involved in drawing from first hand observation and then making a textile/appliqu� style collage. 'Time needs to be carefully apportioned, with children working for some time on a single idea, from inspiration, research, drafting, reviewing, editing, redrafting, modifying, to finished product. Children need to tackle preliminary ideas, have a break, and then come back refreshed to consider what to do next'. (Calloway G. & Kear M., 1999) Session 1 Children to use HB (Hard-Black) pencil. Calloway G. ...read more.

Middle

It is up to them which they would like to draw - they can do two. Ask them to look very carefully - you must not accept a two second drawing - they are to practice looking. Teaching points: Can I make a detailed observational drawing of a fruit? Look at shade and tone - is it all the same colour? Show this with pencil by making it darker in areas where the colour changes. Look at the size of the object - compare it to your hand, nail etc. Resources: HB pencils, A4 cartridge paper, selection of fruit and vegetables (kiwi, apple, orange, tomato, different coloured peppers), knife for slicing in half by adult Session 2 During this session the children are to concentrate on colour. They are to use pencil crayons as ordinary coloured pencils can offer great scope for detailed work, with a subtlety and range of colour and tone which can be achieved according to the type of pencil and the way it is used, (Calloway G. & Kear M., 1999). Coloured pencils are to be used in sets, or sorted into colours in containers with the leads uppermost. ...read more.

Conclusion

* To cut out the templates for their design. * To be able to make their appliqu�. Main Teaching: The children must choose one fruit for their appliqu� design. Ask them to look very closely. * What is the basic shape of the outline? * What is the main colour of the fruit? * What smaller shapes can you see? * How many of those other shapes will you need? Activity: The children are to choose one fruit and make a simple drawing of that fruit. They must then decide what the main shapes within the fruit are and draw them separately. Make sure they draw them big enough - these drawings will be used as a template for their appliqu�. Cut out the paper templates and draw around these onto the felt - make sure that this is done carefully and that they draw enough of each shape. Use felt tip pens for this. Then the children are to cut out the shapes. Each child must have a calico rectangle/square on which they are to make their appliqu�. Attach the felt pieces to the material with PVA glue. Teaching Points: Can I make a simple drawing for my appliqu�? Appliqu� = cut out from one material and apply to another. ...read more.

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