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To what extent was the English Invasion of Irelandan accident, unforeseen and unplanned?

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Introduction

´╗┐To what extent was the English Invasion ?an accident, unforeseen and unplanned?? ________________ When regarding the English invasion of Ireland, characterised by the Richard Fitz Gilbert?s initial invasion in 1169, followed by King Henry II?s arrival in Ireland in 1171, one could argue that it was ?an accident, unforeseen and unplanned?. Indeed, evidence questions that this was even an invasion, but that the Normans were auxiliary forces to Diarmait Mac Murchada in 1169, whose aims consisted of restoring the deposed monarch to the kingship of Leinster.[1] In addition, Henry?s aim in 1171 was merely to consolidate power over Norman held territory in Ireland as his subject Fitz Gilbert, or Strongbow, was sowing the seeds for a kingdom to rival England.[2] However, although it could be argued that the invasion was not foreseen and planned by Henry?s courts initially, the motives, plans and actions of other parties involved would influence his decision in eventually claiming territories in Ireland. Therefore, it is evident that the invasion was not the product of a grand plan, which was purposeful and foreseen, but was formulated through the plans and motives of different parties and the reactions of the Norman king to them. In regards to the invasion itself, a comparison must be drawn between it and the previous invasion of England of 1066, as under the leadership of William the Conqueror which was purposeful, foreseen, planned and executed on a large scale. ...read more.

Middle

His cultivation of good relations between Leinster and England is testament to this and although he may not have realised the sheer importance of this in his earlier kingship, he surely realised this when he was overthrown in 1169. This is displayed with how he directly sailed to Bristol to make use of his relations with Fitz Harding, who had the power to grant him an audience with Henry.[21] One would, therefore, conclude that his campaign to win back his crown was purposeful, foreseen and planned. Diarmait?s monarchic restoration to Leinster may have been planned and would set the piece for an Anglo-Norman takeover, but it would be Strongbow who would catalyse events for this takeover. Any argument for an actual Anglo-Norman invasion laid in the fact that he would aid Diarmait?s campaign of expansion throughout Ireland with his own forces.[22] The Annals of Ulster support this fact by stating that this was ?the beginning of the woes of Ireland?. Regardless, it would be his actions that would push the hand of the Norman King to consolidate his feudal lordship over Anglo-Norman territories in Ireland. These series of actions were started with his alliance with Diarmait which was to see him married to Diarmait?s daughter, and to become heir apparent to the throne of Leinster.[23] This alliance not only saw Diarmait with a powerful ally with access to Jewish moneylenders,[24] testament to his planned campaign, but set Strongbow in a seat of Irish power with the margin to expand it. ...read more.

Conclusion

[16] James Lydon, The Lordship of Ireland in the Middle Ages, p. 32 [17] F. X. Martin, ?Dairmait Mac Murchada and the coming of the Anglo-Normans?, A new history of Ireland II: Medieval Ireland, Art Cosgrove (ed.), 1993, p. 48 [18] F. X. Martin, ?Dairmait Mac Murchada and the coming of the Anglo-Normans?, A new history of Ireland II: Medieval Ireland, Art Cosgrove (ed.), 1993, p. 49 [19] F. X. Martin, ?Dairmait Mac Murchada and the coming of the Anglo-Normans?, A new history of Ireland II: Medieval Ireland, Art Cosgrove (ed.), 1993, p. 48 [20] Edited in Jean Leclerq, Recueil d?etudes sur Saint Bernard et ses ecrit (3 vols, Rome, 1962-9), ii, 313-12 [21] James Lydon, The Lordship of Ireland in the Middle Ages, p. 32 [22] Ibid, p. 38 [23] Flanagan, Irish Society, ch.3 (80-111) [24] James Lydon, The Lordship of Ireland in the Middle Ages, p. 34 [25] F. X. Martin, ?Dairmait Mac Murchada and the coming of the Anglo-Normans?, A new history of Ireland II: Medieval Ireland, Art Cosgrove (ed.), 1993, p. 74 [26] James Lydon, The Lordship of Ireland in the Middle Ages, pp. 38-39 [27] F. X. Martin, ?Dairmait Mac Murchada and the coming of the Anglo-Normans?, A new history of Ireland II: Medieval Ireland, Art Cosgrove (ed.), 1993, p. 80 [28] Ibid, p. 56 [29] Sheehy, Pontificia Hibernica, I, pp. 19-23 [30] James Lydon, The Lordship of Ireland in the Middle Ages, p. 40 [31] James Lydon, The Lordship of Ireland in the Middle Ages, p. 39 [32] Ibid, p. 42 ...read more.

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