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To what extent were the revolutionaries in France and Austria responsible for their own failure?

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Introduction

To what extent were the revolutionaries in France and Austria responsible for their own failure? The 1848 revolutions took place in most parts of Europe was considered to be one of the heights of nationalism and liberal development in the 19th century. However, despite the wide extent of influence of this revolution and its impact, it was put out within the year after with very little, if any, success at all. The revolution did not prevail mainly because it was a "leaderless" revolution with little or even no organization at all, while much of the time was spent in lobbying and negotiating by the idealistic and inexperienced intellectuals, rather than fighting against the counter-revolutionary forces and doing the practical things. The 1848 revolutions were considered as a "leaderless" revolution. ...read more.

Middle

Red republicans - radicals said that they would support hopers of the urban masses. Unfortunately they weren't united. Their leaders hated each other. Most of them wished to establish a republic based on universal manhood suffrage. In France there was also the second group - moderators, who were opposed radicals. They wished only to establish constitutional parliamentary government, tended to have little sympathy for poor, and would like everyone to have right to vote. In Austria, revolutionaries were divided amongst different ethnic groups. With the divided revolutionary groups and no cooperation between them, these people were unable to combine their strength to fight against the reactionary forces and were exterminated one by one. Furthermore, as in France, the revolutionaries were also divided into two groups. ...read more.

Conclusion

On the other hand, the middle class had the fear of the "threat to their property" as a result of some of the socialist revolutionaries' demands.2[6] Also, as most of the revolutions rose in the urban areas, participation of the large rural population, if any, were limited. Another contribution towards the failure of the 1848 revolutions was perhaps the absence of any strong foreign back up by countries that possess enough strength to confront the absolute powers. Red republicans - radicals said that they would support hopers of the urban masses. Unfortunately they weren't united. Their leaders hated each other. Most of them wished to establish a republic based on universal manhood suffrage. In France there was also the second group - moderators, who were opposed radicals. They wished only to establish constitutional parliamentary government, tended to have little sympathy for poor, and would like everyone to have right to vote. ...read more.

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