• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

University Degree: Contract Law

Browse by

Currently browsing by:

Word count:
1000-1999 (2)
2000-2999 (2)

Meet our team of inspirational teachers

find out about the team

Get help from 80+ teachers and hundreds of thousands of student written documents

  • Marked by Teachers essays 4
  1. Marked by a teacher

    UCTA problem

    4 star(s)

    They are:- Whether the notice and clause are incorporated into the contract? Whether UCTA and UTCCR applies? Whether Robert can claim damages on his broken arm and Rolex watch? Whether Lucy can claim damages on the stolen coat? 3.0 Application 3.1 Methods of incorporation An exclusion clause is a term of the contract which attempts to exclude or restrict one's liability which he would otherwise owe to the other. In Henderson v Stephenson1, the court held that the absence of a notice on the front of the ticket referring to clauses on its rear rendered the clauses invalid.

    • Word count: 1688
  2. Marked by a teacher

    Contract Law/Case study

    3 star(s)

    In order to advise Posh as to her legal position, concerning the sale of her shares in Big Bank plc to Becks, it is of paramount importance to determine the existence, if any, of a binding contract between both parties and to what extent Posh may be bound by this. In order for a valid contract to exist, there must be present the following essential elements; agreement, consideration, and the intention to create legal relations.1 It would seem clear from the facts of the present case that there has been an agreement by both parties.

    • Word count: 2560
  3. Marked by a teacher

    Of all of the elements which make up the definition of theft, which are the most problematic? Discuss using case law.

    3 star(s)

    To illustrate the difficulties over the simplest of statements, the example that 'land cannot be stolen' gives rise to a vast number of complex issues surrounding land. For example, land cannot be stolen but what if the "defendant is acting as a trustee or personal representative" (Herring, 2006)? In this case there can be theft of the land if the trustee sells more land then what is required of him. Also other issues surrounding land are things that are part of the land, for example, wild flowers, which can only be stolen if they are taken with the intent of selling them on, yet are not considered as theft if they are taken for personal gain.

    • Word count: 2252
  4. Marked by a teacher

    Contract Law

    3 star(s)

    The final issue that needs to be considered is whether the offer once made can be withdrawn or revoked. The general rule is that the offer can be revoked up until the time it is accepted. The offer was announced in the Sunday sentinel and then cancelled the following day. Bel did not post her entry until Tuesday which meant that the newspaper had already revoked the offer before she had accepted it. However since Bel missed the cancellation of the offer in the Monday edition of the newspaper it can be argued that she had accepted the offer before she was made aware of the cancellation.

    • Word count: 1661

Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?
  • With reference to case law, discuss the difficulties surrounding the legal tests used to identify a contract of employment.

    "All the relevant factors need to be considered, and as long as the employment tribunal takes these into account, their decision will be a question of fact and their finding can not be challenged unless they came to the conclusion which could not be reasonably obtained by any other tribunal. The only thing that is certain is that if there is control, no delegation and a mutuality of obligation the court should find a contract of employment. Going back the original question, it is clear that the tests created by the Courts were inadequate in a modern society. The courts now tend to look at a multitude of factors in deciding employee status. The most important factor, it seems, will be mutuality of obligations. Adrian Williams concludes his article by suggesting that statutory intervention is necessary. I agree that because of the importance and number of rights an 'employee' will receive, it is paramount that the courts can determine worker status accurately. I find it difficult to see though how a statutory test would advance the position we are in now, the position of painting a picture of all factors and balancing them out. Steven Mather"

  • Discuss the impact of the Bosman ruling on European Football. Just over 15 years ago on December 15th 1995, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) in Luxembourg passed a ruling that would dramatically change European football.

    "In conclusion, within this research paper I have tried to explore and explain how the Bosman ruling has affected European football. It is easy to gather that thanks to the Bosman ruling a shift of power has occurred which has allowed players the freedom that they previously never had. Unfortunately for Jean Bosman he never really felt the effects of his own crusade, but unlike his own contractual situation where football clubs were making a decision on a player's behalf, now the player has the bargaining control."

  • It has been said that a promise is enforceable once consideration has been provided. Discuss whether this statement is too simplistic as a description of the principle of consideration.

    "In conclusion, it would be clear to state that a promise is enforceable once consideration has been provided as consideration it many elements combined together. There are four main machanisams which make up consideration; firstly a promise must have some economic value, secondly, consideration need not to be adequate but must be sufficient, thirdly, consideration must move from the promisee and lastly consideration must not be past."

Marked by a teacher

This document has been marked by one of our great teachers. You can read the full teachers notes when you download the document.

Peer reviewed

This document has been reviewed by one of our specialist student essay reviewing squad. Read the full review on the document page.

Peer reviewed

This document has been reviewed by one of our specialist student document reviewing squad. Read the full review under the document preview on this page.