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Interview Plan and Bail

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Introduction

Interview Plan and Bail In this essay I will start by looking at the different things that are needed for an interview plan and for the interview to take place successfully, and then I will go on to describe bail without charge including the limitations and restrictions that can be legally imposed. Before an interview takes place a plan needs to be drawn up to give the officers the opportunity to gain all the relevant information and evidence that could be needed for the interview to take place. An officer needs to be well prepared for an interview, so they do not loose control of the situation1. For the interview to go smoothly the officers should gain some background knowledge of the circumstances of the offence being investigated, and also some general information about the person they are going to be interviewing. For example the officer would need to know if they are interviewing a witness, suspect or victim, family status, any past history of previous offences and also the property that the person being interviewed has on them at the time of arriving at the station in-case they have anything on them relating to the offence2. The officer should consider all possibilities leading up to the incident, and if it is possible for them to do so then they should return to the scene and observe the whole area to see if anything has been missed from the area3. The original photographs and documents from the scene should also be looked at again to see if they can provide any more information about the incident, as well as speaking personally to any witnesses. Once they have spoken to the witnesses and taken note of their account of what happened, the credibility of that witness would then need to be checked up on4, because if they are friends or relatives of the person being interviewed they could give false information such as a false alibi. ...read more.

Middle

By doing this it means that it makes it difficult for deceptive interviewees to successfully claim in court that they meant something differently.21 The time of an interview is important, and when possible the interviewer should arrange it for a time that is suitable for all parties involved but at the earliest possible so the facts are still fresh in their minds. When interviewing any person there is a sequence of questions that must be asked which are; what, where, when, how, why and who.22 The interviewer must be prepared to encourage the witness to expand on their account, but not by using leading questions. This usually depends whether they were a witness to a live event such as an eye witness to a robbery and encourage them to re-live what they saw for a better recollection, or a factual matter such as a formal report for a burglary and use open ended questions to encourage a free narrative.23 When interviewing a witness there are five stages that should be followed which are: 1. Explain the procedures - reasons and structure of interview, what is required of the witness, purpose for a witness statement and what is likely to happen after the interview24 2. Witness's initial account - ask witness to describe what they saw in their own words and time. 3. Expand their account - either use the free recall by asking them to concentrate and possibly imagine the event happening again25 or free narrative by allowing them to talk with no interruptions26 to see if there is anything that the witness has missed. 4. Deal with objectives - ensure that all of the objectives have been covered that were stated in the plan for the interview. 5. Review - go over everything that has been said so both the interviewer and interviewee are clear on what has been said. Allow the witness to correct any mistakes or misinterpretations To gain the most out of the interview itself, all of the procedures that can be found in the Codes of Practice in PACE, should be followed as closely as possible. ...read more.

Conclusion

11 11 Brian Ord & Gary Shaw, Investigative Interviewing Explained, 1st edn...................., p. 11 12 Brian Ord & Gary Shaw, Investigative Interviewing Explained, 1st edn...................., p. 13 13 Brian Ord & Gary Shaw, Investigative Interviewing Explained, 1st edn...................., p. 13 14 Brian Ord & Gary Shaw, Investigative Interviewing Explained, 1st edn...................., p. 17 15 Brian Ord & Gary Shaw, Investigative Interviewing Explained, 1st edn...................., p. 19 16 Brian Ord & Gary Shaw, Investigative Interviewing Explained, 1st edn...................., p. 17 17 Brian Ord & Gary Shaw, Investigative Interviewing Explained, 1st edn...................., p. 24 18 Brian Ord & Gary Shaw, Investigative Interviewing Explained, 1st edn...................., p. 25 19 Brian Ord & Gary Shaw, Investigative Interviewing Explained, 1st edn...................., p. 26 20 Brian Ord & Gary Shaw, Investigative Interviewing Explained, 1st edn...................., p. 27 21 Brian Ord & Gary Shaw, Investigative Interviewing Explained, 1st edn...................., p. 35 22 Brian Ord & Gary Shaw, Investigative Interviewing Explained, 1st edn...................., p. 52 - 53 23 Brian Ord & Gary Shaw, Investigative Interviewing Explained, 1st edn...................., p. 58- 59 24 Brian Ord & Gary Shaw, Investigative Interviewing Explained, 1st edn...................., p. 60 25 Brian Ord & Gary Shaw, Investigative Interviewing Explained, 1st edn...................., p. 64 26 Brian Ord & Gary Shaw, Investigative Interviewing Explained, 1st edn...................., p. 67 27 Neil Corre, Bail in Criminal Proceedings, 3rd edn, Oxford University Press 2004 UK 28 Paul Ozin, Heather Norton & Perry Spivey, PACE a practical guide to the police and criminal evidence act 1984, Oxford University Press 2006, USA, p. 76 29 Neil Corre, Bail in Criminal Proceedings, 3rd edn Oxford University Press 2004 UK 30 Paul Ozin, Heather Norton & Perry Spivey, PACE a practical guide to the police and criminal evidence act 1984, Oxford University Press 2006, USA, p. 77 31 http://www.cjsonline.gov.uk/defendant/Bail/index.html 32 Neil Corre, Bail in criminal proceedings, 3rd edn, Oxford University Press 2004 UK 33 Neil Corre, Bail in criminal proceedings, 3rd edn, Oxford University Press 2004 UK 34 Neil Corre, Bail in criminal proceedings, 3rd edn, Oxford University Press 2004 UK ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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