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What barriers must be removed in the European Union to ensure the free movement of goods? Explain how this will help trade between member States.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Suzanne K. Menzies. Outcome 2. Tutor: Michelle Semple. Contents. Introduction............................................................................................ 3 Part 1 - ................................................................................................... 4 - 8 What barriers must be removed in the European Union to ensure the free movement of goods? Explain how this will help trade between member States. Part 2 - .................................................................................................. 9 - 12 How has the standardisation of fiscal policy helped establish the single market? Part 3 - ................................................................................................. 13 - 17 Explain how the European Social Policy has attempted to ensure citizens can work and provide services in a Member State within the European Union. Part 4 - ................................................................................................... 18 - 20 What restrictions do exist within the European Union, with regards to the free movement concept of the Single European Market? Conclusion............................................................................................... 21 Appendix 1........................................................................................ 22 2........................................................................................ 23 3........................................................................................ 24 4........................................................................................ 25 5........................................................................................ 26 6........................................................................................ 27 Bibliography............................................................................................. 28 Introduction. The framework for European integration, in respect of a single market, originated as the Four Freedoms, (: Goods, Services, People and Capital), enshrined in the Treaty of Rome. The initial six Member States, (: Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxembourg, France, Germany and Italy), began what has become a continuous challenge in the development of the single market. The venture: to completely harmonise the laws of Member States and adopting detailed legislation, has proved to be a process of great complexity due to the scope of certain policy areas. Through the abolition of any restricting laws, whether they may be barriers or tariffs, in order of achieving a large market base that is efficient. In this report I am going to look at the barriers that must be removed to ensure the free movement of goods and how the standardisation off fiscal policy has aided the establishment of Europe's single market. Also I am going to give some degree of understanding as to how the European Social Policy has given citizens the right to both work and provide services in another Member State. ...read more.

Middle

other countries outside the EU who might otherwise sell goods to Member States with a lower tariff on the understanding that the Member could sell these goods onto other EU members. Common Customs Tariff. This is a list of taxes laid out by the classification of products. All Tariffs are applicable to Member States and the tariffs have to apply to all imported products from outside the EU. The Commission regularly up-dates and publishes customs tariffs. Whereas before excise duties had several forms, minimum rates for all products have been decided. A unified taxation system does not eliminate all potential sources of market distortion, but it does however facilitate it greatly. Part 3. Explain how the European Social Policy has attempted to ensure citizens can work and provide services in a Member State within the European Union. Having developed Europe on an economic level, there was a need for development on a social level: whilst at the same time, giving Members European Citizenship through the permission of the mobility of labour. For without ample social provisions, economic integration is not possible. With regard to workers and job seekers, they can take up residence in any of the 15 Member States and still have equal rights to the access of employment in both the public and private sectors. The measures of Social Policy were designed to guarantee the free movement of workers and ensure that the single market would have effective translation into improvements for workers. To work and provide services in another Member State is an essential standard of social integration. Where there once was a multitude of barriers to this standard now stands a gateway to improved working conditions, increased benefits and greater provisions of state aid. Total harmonisation of every Member State's policies was neither a possibility nor an objective of the Union. However, the intention was to create a framework from which to base social provisions for an economic and socially integrated Europe. ...read more.

Conclusion

The ECJ therefore held that the tax was a tax placed on goods that were crossing an internal community border, which has the effect of impeding intra-community trade. Thus, the Italian government's levying was indeed contrary to Article 12. Appendix 5. The Commission V. The United Kingdom. Here the issue was concerning beer and wine. Although both alcohol products, they are not similar as their production involves different methods and as a result, wine is stronger. Therefore, due to the lack of similarity, Article 95 (1) was not applicable to this situation. In order for Article 95 (2) to come into play, the Commission had to prove that both products were in competition with each other and that a higher taxation charge on wine benefited the domestic beer producers. The ECJ held that wine and beer were interchangeable, particularly at the cheaper end of the market and the practises of the UK were infact contravening Article 95 (2). Appendix 6. Law governing the Free Movement Of Workers - Articles 39, 39(2), 39(3), 39(4). Article 39. Confers on workers the right of Free Movement between Member States and the right to earn a wage or salary. Article 39(2). Abolishes any discrimination based on Nationality between workers of another Member State, as regards to employment, remuneration and other conditions of work and employment. Article 39(3). Insists that a worker shall have the right to: * Accept offers of employment. * To move freely within the European Union for this purpose. * To stay in a Member State for the purpose of employment, in accordance with the provisions governing the employment of Nationals of that Member. * To remain in the territory of a Member State after having been employed there. However, Article 39 has two sets of exceptions to the basic principle of free movement, they are both limitations and are also 'Escape Routes'. Article 39(3). Limitations justified on the grounds of: * Public Policy * Public Security * Public Health, etc. Article 39(4). Excludes employment in the public sector. This Article is an escape route that is available to the State. ...read more.

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