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Why I Write is a short essay by George Orwell (1946) in which he details the different writing stages he went through since his childhood until he became an adult

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Introduction

REVIEW OF GEORGE ORWELL: "WHY I WRITE" "Why I Write" is a short essay by George Orwell (1946) in which he details the different writing stages he went through since his childhood until he became an adult, and the reasons that encouraged and motivated him to become a passionate writer. Moreover, the author deals with writers� different motivations during their lives and also their intentions when they put pen to paper. In the essay, Orwell introduces background information. The aim of providing the latter is to allow readers to have a deep knowledge of his development as a writer and thus, be able to have a much more objective point of view to criticize his motives for writing. Orwell, at a young age, felt that he had a special dominating word power. Although he tried to escape from that sort of world, he finally carried on with it and wrote his first poem which was published on a local newspaper at the age of eleven. Firstly, he was engaged in literary activities. Afterwards, from the age of fifteen until twenty five, he narrated his own life, actually, making a great effort to write seriously. The author states "I was somewhat lonely, and I soon develop disagreeable mannerisms which made me unpopular throughout my school days"1. The lonely feelings he suffered when he was a child made him become isolated from his peers and thus, he developed a particular attitude which definitely influenced him on his way of writing for the rest of his life. ...read more.

Middle

Therefore, from that moment onwards, Orwell became involved on the democratic socialist movement as he stated "Every line of serious work that I have written since 1936 has been written, against totalitarianism and for democratic socialism. [..]. And the more one is conscious of one�s political bias, the more chance one has of acting politically [..]".9 It is appreciable on the latter statement how this author was focused on the events that were occurring at his present without taking in count the past. According to me, Orwell barely gives relevance to embedding ourselves with knowledge about our ancestors. The political facts going on during that time affected his present, this being his focal point. Hence, acting against the actual situation in the 1930s, was the the way of helping so as not to make the same mistakes in the future. In comparison, Antonio Gramsci (1950,p.324) in "Selections from the prison notebooks" argues "The starting-point of critical elaboration is the consciousness of what one really is, and knowing thyself as a product of the historical process to date which has deposited in you an infinity of traces, without leaving an inventory. The first thing to do is to make such an inventory"10. Gramsci�s point of view, in contrast with Orwell�s, is focused on the past knowledge in order to build up coherent criticisms on the present. ...read more.

Conclusion

This author with the below evidence wants to transmit either that great poetry is composed out of feelings or the necessity of every writer not to exclude their own personality so as not to kill their motivation to write. According to me, the latter idea is the one that both authors have in common. In conclusion, "Why I Write" is an essay that shows Orwell�s fascination with the psychology behind writing. He demonstrates through his words that he is the kind of writer who completely understood his profession and thus, illustrating the motivations which encouraged him to become a writer. Furthermore, the way he puts forward his feelings and emotions to his words among everything, reflect a crucial part of his personality; a real fighter. REFERENCING: George Orwell (1946). Why I Write . London: Gangrel. Antonio Gramsci (1971). Selections from the Prison Notebooks of Antonio Gramsci. London: Lawrence and Wishart. T.S. Eliot (1919). Tradition and the Individual Talent. London: The Egoist. 1 George Orwell (1946). Why I Write . London: Gangrel. 1. 2 Ibid. 2. 3 Ibid. 2-3. 4 Ibid. 2. 5 Ibid. 3. 6 Ibid. 7 Ibid. 8 Ibid. 2. 9 Ibid. 4. 10 Antonio Gramsci (1971). Selections from the Prison Notebooks of Antonio Gramsci. London: Lawrence and Wishart 11 Ibid. 5. 12 George Orwell (1946). Why I Write . London: Gangrel. 6. 13 Ibid. 14 T.S. Eliot (1919). Tradition and the Individual Talent. London: The Egoist 15 Ibid. 3. ...read more.

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