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University Degree: Medieval

Browse by
Geoffrey Chaucer (57)
Other Authors (1)
Word count:
fewer than 1000 (18)
1000-1999 (30)
2000-2999 (8)
3000+ (2)

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  1. Of Vice and Virtue: Chaucer's Clergy

    • Word count: 1003
    • Submitted: 19/09/2007
  2. What is the Merchant like?

    • Word count: 1779
    • Submitted: 20/06/2006

Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?
  • Discuss differences in effect and structure created by the first-person narration in Dante's The Inferno, and Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.

    "In conclusion, it can be seen that Dante and Chaucer choose to employ first person narration for vastly different reasons. In the case of The Inferno, this perspective is ideal for the introduction of humanistic literary techniques and an increase in the importance of individual characterisation above role and gender stereotypes. It also increases the elements of adventure, as we are very close to Dante and the unfolding events. Ultimately, it serves to heighten the solo hope and futility of his epic quest (although not travelling alone, his destination is ultimately a personal one), while enriching the journey with the detail of characterisation and the characterisation of personally perceived detail. Chaucer, on the other hand, has far more mischievous motivations, and employs the first person perspective throughout his many tales in order that the characters get a fair chance to present themselves and that we get a fair chance to judge them. He relishes the fact that, given enough rope, they will inevitably satirise themselves to a degree that cannot be argued with."

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