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University Degree: Other Authors

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  1. Symbolism in Lord of The Flies

    As the boys splinter into factions, some behave peacefully and work together to maintain order and achieve common goals, while others rebel and seek only anarchy and violence. According to Golding, the predisposition that humankind have toward evil and violence coupled with the "psychology of fear" motivates humanity to act in unreasonable ways. When the United States used the atomic bomb in Japan, more than 100,000 people were killed in three days by dropping two bombs. Overall, a total of 55 million people lost their lives in World War II.

    • Word count: 2037
  2. A close reading of an extract from Aphra Behn's "Oroonoko".

    Each sentence is extensive and includes several semicolons. Behn begins each paragraph with an introductory statement. In the first, this is as follows: "...Caesar told him, there was no Faith in the White Men, or the Gods they Ador'd". She then uses the punctuation to create a list of why this is so; be it because of their "Principles so false" or that they "profess[ed] so much (and) perform[ed] so little". In doing this Behn is able to do two things. Firstly, Oroonoko's anti-Christian thought (he could "...never be reconcil'd with our notions of the trinity"1)

    • Word count: 1693
  3. "A Good Man Is Hard To Find" by Flannery OConnor. A Literary Analysis

    According to Bryant, this is being pushed to the extreme in O'Connor's work, where she makes it fully clear that everybody can change and eventually reach salvation, even though some people must encounter the most extreme situations, in this case death, to reach enlightenment. In the very beginning of the story, we get to see one of the grandmother's basic traits; she is manipulative, and she shows no hesitation when it comes to convince people into doing what she wants them to do (301).

    • Word count: 1313
  4. An Analysis of Nadine Gordimer's Short Stories

    The people in her stories seem to be only thinking of themselves and their actions. In "An Emissary" there is one setting where it is always summer or summer-like weather. This adds onto the lack of awareness of the presence of death, because winter is a symbol for death. I relate to these people because I often avoid the thought of death. When I actually stop to think about it I realize how much time I am wasting; this gives me anxiety, which in turn makes me block it out more. These stories made me realize that even the little things should not be held for granted because you could die at any moment.

    • Word count: 961
  5. Can we critically analyse Ian McEwan's Atonement using psychoanalytic criticism?

    The audience, then through the omniscient narrator recall on an event that happens between Briony's sister Cecelia and the cleaning lady's son Robbie, at first from Cecelia's point of view and then Briony's. From Cecelia's point of view we are told how Cecelia does not think much of Robbie as it 'bothered her that they were awkward when they talked'3. We then encounter how Cecelia wonders outside to fill a vase of flowers with water from the fountain, where she finds Robbie doing the gardening, the pair of them passes awkward conversation then Robbie begins to help Cecelia fill her vase, to which she resists and this results in her dropping the vase into the fountain.

    • Word count: 2241
  6. Analysis of 'Defeat' by Osbert Sitwell. 1948.

    The German officer's interference marks the tipping point of the Captain's realization of defeat and total lack of desire to keep fighting mentally. The Captain has been through hell and back and after his homecoming he encounters a society unable to support and grasp the magnitude of his emotional grief over fallen comrades and humiliation over lost territory. When dealing with our protagonist, the 3rd person narrator is omniscient and, consequently, we have a rather straightforward and uncensored insight to the mind and being of the Captain.

    • Word count: 935
  7. Chronicle of a Death Foretold theme anaylsis

    So when the brothers find out their sister's virginity has been taken by another man and shamed their family, they must restore honor to the family's name and kill the man who did it. I think the theme of this novella is how important honor is in a small community, such as the one in this story. The novella starts off with the death of the main character, Santiago Nasar. After that the story starts before Angela Vicario's wedding and works up to the murder.

    • Word count: 1179
  8. How, why, and to what effect do contemporary British fictions depict times other than the present?

    When compared to Cloud Atlas however, What Was Lost is a relatively simple way of structuring a narrative. The best analogy for describing the narrative of Cloud Atlas is a Russian doll. Each story (there are six), interlocks with another tale from a later age with the main character of the new story coming across the previous narrative and offering their thoughts on it. Mitchell takes the 'story-within-a-story' idea and expands upon it six-fold. By having six different time periods available to him due to this structuring, Mitchell is able to weave thematic content throughout the novel as he binds the narratives together.

    • Word count: 2653
  9. Examine the figure of the outsider in any contemporary British work of fiction.

    A fantastic text in the words of Tzvetan Todorov must: '...oblige the reader to consider the world of the characters as a world of living persons and to hesitate between a natural and a supernatural explanation of the events described. Second, this hesitation may also be experienced by a character; thus the reader's role is so to speak entrusted to a character...'1 The Little Stranger fulfils the criteria of 'the fantastic' which is having events that cannot be explained under the laws of reality as we know it.

    • Word count: 1648
  10. Joseph Hellers themes and narrative styles in Catch-22

    Surrounding conditions 1.1 The author Joseph Heller Joseph Heller was born on May 1, 1923 and grew up in the Coney Island section of Brooklyn, New York. His parents were poor Jewish from Russia. Already as a child, he enjoyed writing. After graduating from Abraham Lincoln High School, he worked as a file clerk in an insurance office for a year. 1942, he joined the US Army Air Corps and when he was 21, he served in the US Air Force as a bombardier in Italy and flew 60 missions.

    • Word count: 9162
  11. Remember whose girl you are...Discuss the representation of power and control between females in Affinity

    The coding system that co-ordinates the prisoners within the prison system also Illustrates how the matrons exercise authority over the prisoners. Selina, in the novel, is referred to like a servant by the matrons, as she suggests that "They call me Dawes here, like a servant."5Selina's position as a criminal deprives her of identity and her status in society descends. The authority of females over other females in Milbank prison mirrors that of Margaret's household, as this is particularly seen by Mrs Prior's treatment of Margaret.

    • Word count: 1783
  12. Nancy Mairs Essay Synthesis of Mairs Three Essays on the Argument for the Defense of a Life of Hardship and Suffering Nancy Mairs is a writer who was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis when she was 28 years old.

    Through the restrictions and problems she has faced it has awoken her to find new meaning in life. Proof of her spiritual growth in the first essay comes from the maturity in her thoughts about the labeling of her condition. She does not want to be called physically challenged but to be referred to by a more blunt classification. As a 'cripple', 'I am different from the woman in her parka and goggles, face cracked and blackened, setting out on the last day's exhausted plod to the summit'.

    • Word count: 1490
  13. What is the 'all that' that Robert Graves is referring too?

    (Jonathan Cape, 1929) This quotation from Robert Graves himself shows why he chose to write his autobiography at a comparatively young age to other auto-biographers. A major part, probably the most major event of his life; the war, had come to an end and he felt that his memories and experiences ought not to be subject to the effects of old age and forgotten, lost in the passages of time. The first section of Robert Graves's novel is about his childhood and mainly his time at various preparatory schools and Charterhouse.

    • Word count: 2256
  14. Amir Vs Amir

    Amir on the other is almost nothing like this, he is but a small, creative and weak character. Baba is often heard putting Amir down and generally being hard and cold toward him, more so than with other children even. Amir gets into scuffles with bullies and is too afraid to face them and runs away. This is entirely against Baba's feelings on how a young man should defend himself, and he lets Amir know this. Baba wants Amir to play sports, like soccer Baba's favorite sport; but Amir is a writer, a creative soul and wants to do that and is very good at it.

    • Word count: 1278
  15. Free essay

    Howard W. Campbell

    He is a playwright and is an associate of the members of the Nazi party and becomes a Nazi himself, though only in name and to be able to live and work comfortably in the Nazi ruled Germany. After being approached by Major Wirtanen of the U.S. about being a spy for the Allied forces he reluctantly agrees. I feel that though he was hesitant at first that from the beginning who knew that it was the right thing to do and knew that the Nazis were about to be doing terrible things.

    • Word count: 1315
  16. Straying from the Path

    Then the girl strips off her clothes, throws them into the fire, and joins the wolf in bed. After a ritual exchange about body parts where the wolf reveals that he will eat the girl with his big mouth, the girl outsmarts the wolf and escapes. As a tale about the initiation into adulthood, the folk tale "did more than symbolize the child's ability to defeat danger and evil by resorting to cunning: it also demonstrated the importance of women's knowledge to survival" (Bacchilega 56). The story was rewritten by Perrault in the 17th century. According to Cristina Bacchilega, Perrault's tale was "written for the aristocracy, with a style to satisfy the highly cultivated adult reader, and morals meant to educate the young in civilized behaviour" (57).

    • Word count: 2603
  17. Comment on the ways in which Rhys portrays the differences between Rochester and Antoinette's cultural backgrounds in this section.

    When she uses imperative 'Taste', there is a sense of power and determinism. This creates an effect of Rochester's weakness which is shown when he says, 'to please her I drank'. It shows his inferiority to the lack of knowledge about the place and the culture. Not only does Antoinette dominate Rochester, but even the place itself is dominating him. When he says 'And yet...', his thought is lost when the nature interrupts him, 'A bird whistled'. This displays his incompetence of being in control of himself and that the nature is more powerful than Rochester is.

    • Word count: 1242
  18. Discuss the language of religion in Frank McCourt's "Angela's Ashes" and James Joyce's "A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man" in relation to one another and to the various uses of language in general, taking into account the importance of this language

    The concerns of Joyce and McCourt, though, appear to be with the first two types (more detailed examples of exactly how will soon follow). The focus of Angela's Ashes is primarily McCourt's schooldays, during which time the principal tenets of Christianity are drummed into them in the form of "commands, injunctions, exhortations, wishes etc." - mainly in application to heresy, both written and spoken ('Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord in vain' and so on). Equally, there are a great many instances of this in Joyce's novel.

    • Word count: 3907
  19. Natasha Walters in The Independent asks about Jonathan Franzen's 'The Corrections': Do we care much, in that rushed last chapter that Enid "weathered the downturn" in the markets, that Denise "moved to Brooklyn and went to work in a new res

    The stock market term can also be seen to relate to the correction in Enid's values that is given centre stage in the last chapter. She re-evaluates her previous over-valuation of her children, of taste, of class and of high morals. The correction Enid undergoes is also slow in coming. It is not an overnight realisation, but a gradual shift in the importance she places on St. Judean values. Throughout the novel Enid has overvalued her children, she has invested too much in them.

    • Word count: 2090
  20. Being Adult

    - Tugcan, you innocent kid. What were you expecting? This is school, man. It is supposed to be boring. - Yes, you are completely right but they could have let us use them only in the lunch brake, so we wouldn't have to "escape" to finish our song. - Teachers and ,especially, the headmaster think those computers are souvenirs. Tugcan's voice was thinner than the other boy's who continued talking; - Another thing you should realize is that schools are not interested in art, especially music.

    • Word count: 1126
  21. With reference to Judith Butler's Precarious Lives, explain how Chris Abani's novel The Virgin of Flames re-imagines global community in the contexts of violence, war and mourning.

    Butler asserts that violence is a product of our refusal to accept our inherent vulnerability and she regards this vulnerability as the key to understanding why certain lives are more exposed to the dynamics of violence than others, thus making them less grievable. It is therefore this hierarchy of grief, which leads to discrimination and inequality, which must be overcome in order to establish a new worldwide body politic. Butler argues that the grief which follows violence furnishes us with a sense of political community as the changes we undergo after mourning help to reveal the ties that bind us and subsequently challenges the autonomous control we think we have over ourselves.

    • Word count: 2691
  22. The prose style by the author of The Stranger, Albert Camus, is reflected in the description of the main character, Meursault

    The first part of the book is about the day of Meursault?s mother?s funeral. ?Maman died today. Or yesterday maybe, I don?t know. I got a telegram from the home. ?Mother deceased. Funeral tomorrow. Faithfully yours.?? That doesn?t mean anything. Maybe it was yesterday?(Camus 3). Meursault received bad news that his mother had died, however, his reaction to the news makes it sound like it does not matter much to him. Later on in the chapter Meursault makes the readers furious with his indifference as a son. Not shedding any tears on behalf of the death of his mother and did not carrying when and why she passed away.

    • Word count: 914
  23. 'Burmese Days' by George Orwell

    Burmese Days is commonly referred to as an anti-imperialist novel which closes down ‘the entire genre of imperial heroics’. It is true that Orwell has created a novel which is distinguished from earlier colonial writings, such as those Kipling and Forster by, but as it has been mentioned before, ‘it lacks a firm commitment to antiâimperialism’, both on the part of Flory and his author’s or as Boehmer points out appropriately Burmese Days ‘does not diverge significantly from a colonialist semiotic’and it is an ‘ambivalent text’ . As Edward Said says that Intruders control the fiction and all types of writings and misrepresent the natives.They indirectly convey their message.

    • Word count: 3040
  24. Gail Jones, Sixty Lights, set in Australia, India and England in the 19th Century, follows the multi-faceted life of the capricious Lucy Strange as she develops her modernistic view of light and the world,

    ?What remade her world: The capture of light.?(Pg. 139). ?Sixty Lights? is set in the 19th Century Victorian society, where the rise of photography becomes apparent and expands to become the ubiquitous form of memory in the 21st Century. Photography; ?light writing? is the central theme in the novel, it is ambiguous in the sense that not only does Lucy develop her love and appreciation of this ?light writing? but also Gail Jones lexicon choice is a form of ?light writing?, creating whimsical images captured through her lexicon of image-laden words and light embedded words.

    • Word count: 3016
  25. Analysing Four American Short Stories - Joyce Carol Oates: Capital Punishment (1992)

    As the story unravels, it seems as though Mr. Brunty has a history of violence. Both in the second paragraph on page 268, where it seemed as though he?d hit Harriet, and in the third last paragraph on page 273, where he is close, but refrains from, as he remembers hitting his daughter in the past. This explains why she still has respect for him, even in her defiant teens. Both of them are proud beings with superior behavior. They worry about each other, him as he gets a phone call after her demonstrating against the death sentence of the inmate on page 269, ?Is she all right?

    • Word count: 2675

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