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Medieval literature. There ware many famous medieval authors John Gower- Confesso Amantis William Langland- Piers Plowman Julian of Norwich- Revelations of love But by far the most famous was Geoffrey Chaucer

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Introduction

Medieval literature. There ware many famous medieval authors * John Gower- Confesso Amantis * William Langland- Piers Plowman * Julian of Norwich- Revelations of love But by far the most famous was Geoffrey Chaucer who was the author of the Canterbury tales. Often regarded as the father of English literature he was born in London in 1340 the son of a vintner. Chaucer's literary activity is often divided into three periods. The first period includes his early work (to 1370), which is based largely on French models; Chaucer's chief works during this time are the Book of the Duchess, an allegorical lament written in 1369. Chaucer's second period (up to c.1387) is called his Italian period because during this time his works were modelled primarily on Dante and Boccaccio. ...read more.

Middle

Thomas � Becket at Canterbury. To help pass the time they decide to tell stories. Together, the pilgrims represent a wide cross section of 14th-century English life. Medieval styles of literature Most of the literature in the early middle ages was religious; monks would make copies of the bible featuring ornate decorative calligraphy, as very few people knew how to read or right there was little point in publishing books and novels. However towards the end of the 14th century Authors began to create poetry and plays. Although these plays still contained a high religious content, they were still a step towards the literary freedom that occurs today Society in the middle ages The middle Ages saw several fierce contests for the Crown, culminating in the Wars of the Roses, which lasted for nearly a century. ...read more.

Conclusion

The high point of monarchical power was attained during the reign of Edward I (1272-1307); the low points of monarchical power were scattered all throughout medieval English history: the reigns of John, Edward II, and Richard II being the bleakest. * Rich The rich of medieval England lived in large manor estates stretching for mile upon mile. They would charge peasants rent to live in their land, use their oven and hunt. The rich would eat dear, boar, hare and rabbit as well as trout and salmon. They would drink ale and malt * Poor Lived on land owned by lords of the manor. Often lived in wooden shacks or stone boxes. They would sleep on straw beds covered with a woollen blanket if lucky. The poor would eat, Maslin bread a mixture of Rye and Barley. They would also live on a broth of beans; if lucky the peasants may catch a hedgehog or squirrel ...read more.

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