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University Degree: Television & Radio Studies

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  1. A rhetorical look at "Television The Plug In Drug" by Marie Winn

    She continues to build upon her ethos with the types of people she chooses to quote. Winn is writing to an audience of mothers, fathers, and parental figures, she uses quotes and statements from every type of person this audience would look to as peers or someone of high reputes. If you were to read an article written by your child's teacher telling you something you would probably not question much due to the fact that you have already have a rapport with this person.

    • Word count: 982
  2. The depiction of gender within sitcoms. For this study I have chosen to use the popular television series The Golden Girls.

    Many programmes tried to remove this stereotypes from viewer's minds, shows such as "Cagney & Lacey" and "Wonder Woman" made their bids to portray women in leading roles and in entirely different circumstances but unfortunately none were as successful at causing a stir on television like "The Golden Girls". The show aired in 1985 and featured three elderly ladies (Dorothy Zbornak, Blanche Deveraux and Rose Nylund) living together in a house on Miami Beach, they were then joined by a fourth member (Sophia Petrillo)

    • Word count: 1662
  3. Depiction of ethnic minorities within a family context. I hope to analyse the depiction of several racial identities within a family context on two highly popular British soap operas, Eastenders on BBC1 and Coronation Street on ITV1.

    British soap operas have become a necessity in everyday life to most of the population, soap operas connect viewers with realistic and dramatic lives on their television. They draw in on the viewers desire for connectivity to different people's lives and their problems, big and small. These desires are also referred to as "Social Realistic Conventions", (Livingston, S: Making Sense Of Television).

    • Word count: 1528
  4. With reference to several examples explain what is meant by TECHNOLOGICAL DETERMINISM and analyse its overall importance in the development of mass media products

    Progress, in particular, is the history of these inventions, which 'created the modern world'. The effects of these technologies, whether direct or indirect, foreseen or unforeseen, are as it were the rest of history" (Williams, 1990). Technological determinism is the idea that technology is an autonomous force within our lives. If this concept is accurate then we are presented with a matrix-like proposition of humans being the servants of new technology rather new technology serving us. This is not necessarily designed to be taken literally; it is not implying that we will all soon be at the mercy of some robotic task master.

    • Word count: 1842
  5. Research Investigation To what extent does a music video follow the narrative set by the lyrics? The presentation of narrative within a music video can be influenced in various ways.

    However, Claude Levi-Strauss2 observed that we make sense of the world, people and events through binary opposites e.g. good versus evil or peace versus war, which therefore could be a constant 'disruption' to the narrative structure which Todorov suggested. All forms of media use a narrative structure e.g. news reports, radio shows, films, plays etc. However one form of media which doesn't follow a direct narrative structure is that of music videos. Music videos tend to suggest a story rather than explain a story to the audience. This is also due to a video is often being 'cut between a narrative and performance of the song by the band'3 and therefore cannot 'embody complete narrative or convey finely wrought stories'4.

    • Word count: 2297
  6. This essay aims to address the role of the BBC in the past, at the beginning, and see how this contrasts with its position in our society today.

    To safeguard its independence from commercial or political influence, it is funded by the licence fee and overseen by a board of directors" On January 1st 1927, the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) took over the works of an amalgamation of companies which had initially formed the 4year old British Broadcasting Company. The charter of this new corporation gave definition to public service. Initially, according to Scannell & Cardiff (1991) the concept of public service was fixed onto "an initial pragmatic set of arrangements between the Post Office and the British radio industry to establish a broadcasting service that would create

    • Word count: 2507
  7. Explain how visual representations of children are informed by particular discourses of childhood.

    A way in which visual representations of childhood is depicted uses different discourses. A discourse uses no sets of beliefs about childhood; it creates a set of ideas and places children in groups in relation to other age groups. The social constructionist's approach is to use discourses when answering this question. There are two discourses of childhood that we can adhere to when answering the main question; these are the romantic discourse of childhood and the puritan discourse. The romantic discourse aims to protect a child's innocence; it views them as being wholesome and needing protection from the wide world.

    • Word count: 1490
  8. True Blood. True blood will be analyzed using a Christian ideology, exploring the value and themes in the context of this ideology.

    True blood will be analyzed using a Christian ideology, exploring the value and themes in the context of this ideology. In season one of True Blood the audience is slowly introduced to all the characters, many of these characters in are supernatural or have supernatural powers. The main character Sookie Stackhouse is a telepath; this ability allows her to hear other people's thoughts. Her love interest is Bill Comptone is a vampire, a creature that was once human but now is a 'living dead' with superhuman strength, speed, healing and mind control powers.

    • Word count: 1453
  9. Cours marketing

    solution ? Etape 1 : Sur le march� (analyse externe), sur l'entreprise (analyse interne) Etape 2 : Compte tenu de l'environnement, comment se situe l'entreprise ?, quel est le probl�me � r�soudre ?, comment le faire �voluer ? Analyse externe : * Indentification du march� : on recherche l'espace concurrentiel dans lequel se positionne l'entreprise (" march� pertinent ") Analyse du march� : objectifs : r�v�ler les faits marquants de la situation et les �volutions d'un march�. (Crit�re d'analyse : vente en volume vente en valeur, tendances d'�volution du march� global, des prix)

    • Word count: 1847
  10. This essay will discuss the representation of crime in the media in relation to ethnic minorities. Several related cases will be used to make points, examples, analysed and evaluated in detail to attempt to examine this statement.

    In many countries it is the third most time-absorbing activity after sleep and work. Not surprisingly, public opinion surveys regularly show that television is cited as by far the most important source of information about what is going on in the world, well above newspapers and radio. In the 60s, the media's representation of ethnic minorities became well known and caused riots in the USA. A few years later president Lyndon B. Johnson had created the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders, this report concluded that "the overall treatment by the media of the Negro ghettos, community relations, racial attitudes,

    • Word count: 2328
  11. Is genre a useful way of analysing television? The norms and conventions that are found in texts that have expectations and audiences understanding are linked by theorists to genre. In this respect genre seeks to explain how audiences categorize what t

    Each genre portrays a constant worldview that forms the way we think about our world. "The study of genre has been carried out in relation to television using approaches and terms deriving from the study of genre in film, literature and other cultural forms" (Bignell Jonathan, Television studies, 2004, p 124). This is appropriate since some of the most established television genres derive from types found in other media. For example, the soap genre began in radio broadcasting, where characters were formed by focusing on their relationships and this notion was targeted to mainly a female audience.

    • Word count: 3595
  12. Comparison of public and private broadcasting Networks in Canada

    Canada also has a national network, the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN) which programs mainly from the First Nations. It is treated as a part of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission Network. In the greater part of Canada, however, it is aired on Cable television only. The official national networks are CBC, APTN, Radio- Canada and TVA while TQS is considered a provincial network for Quebec. CTV and Global are legally considered to be television services but they operate as television networks. Most of these stations are owned by the network themselves but may have affiliates that are owned differently 2.

    • Word count: 2376
  13. The Music Business Research Project: Angel Music Group

    Some of the key events and brands that Angel Music Group have been responsible for include; Global Gathering, Godskitchen, Escape into the Park and Air Nightclub. The Angel Music Group stamp also travels overseas with events not only regularly being produced in the UK but across the globe with; Unites States, South America, Russia, Europe, Australia, Asia and South Africa. Due to the brands initial success in the international market, Mama Group Plc bought a 70% stake in Angel Music Group for �2.625 million in 2008, in hopes to increase its exposure in the international music market.

    • Word count: 3914
  14. How Does The Media Represent Rap/Hip-Hop?

    'There is a general consensus among both academic and non-academic accounts of hip-hop that the style originated in the South Bronx area of New York during the early 1970's' (Bennett, 2000, p. 134). Rap music is something that's being done, where as hip hop is something that is being lived, therefore to understand the birth of rap we need to take a look at the South Bronx. The South Bronx was part of a notorious borough of New York City, marked by some of the worst levels of unemployment, dereliction and violent crime in America.

    • Word count: 2227
  15. How does the Television Drama Series Shameless, Disrupt Stereotypes of Working Class Ideologies?

    The working class are usually interpreted as people who earn very little money for long hard work or in some cases people who would live off benefits. The people who were categorised into this class are considered to be at the bottom of the capitalist system who don't own any means to production. Employees' (working class) earnings never depended simply upon the prevailing wage rate; they depended upon the hours that workers were able, and willing, to work. It is also easy to fall into the error that wage earnings comprised working people's sole source of income.

    • Word count: 3456
  16. Technological determinism?

    Society originated due to the invention of oral communication, the first mode of communication. During this period, knowledge and the distribution of information occurred on a face-to-face bases. Information rested vastly on individuals, and such individuals ability to retain it and also apply it in the course of his/her life. Rhythmic or poetry is the best ways of recording and recalling stories or events.2 Also in this mode, there was a sense of space that divides the author from the receivers.

    • Word count: 2208
  17. : Issues in Contemporary Media and Culture Studies

    As an overtly British advert, whiteness and central identities (Daniels, 1997) can be explored in this text due to the fact that although the dominant central identity of this society is white, masculine, European, the advert does not suggest this at all. It includes many other minority identities, therefore, one can explore the presentation and formation of these different identities and why whiteness doesn't dominate in this advert as expected. This text also addresses issues multiculturalism in Britain, therefore, diversification (Adorno, 1945)

    • Word count: 2049
  18. NEW MEDIA AND OLD MEDIA

    Unlike in the past information is able to flow at a faster rate regardless of geographical location which was the case in the past because of telephony systems "which had been based upon circuit switching and geographically limited networks" (Flew:2005). Networking also develops as a result of network development as Holmes (2005: 184) argued "New media has the ability to connect like-minded others worldwide." In the new media network is decentralised unlike in the old media wherein it was centralised and controlled to promote the interest of those in control as Castells (1996 as cited by Flew:2005)

    • Word count: 1560
  19. What has been the social, cultural, political and technological impact the TV programme Big Brother has had on us, the television viewer?

    They perform tasks in order to win prizes and extend their shopping budget for the week. In previous years, the contestants were usually young, good-looking and charismatic, but as the show has grown in popularity, and therefore attracted a wider viewing demographic, they have gone for a mixture of people, old and young, good-looking and not so good-looking. The show makes celebrities out of members of the public. No other show, in the past, has made people over-night celebrities quite like "Big Brother".

    • Word count: 2064
  20. 'Don't hate the media, become the media' Jello Biafra. Is the relationship between producers and consumers changing?

    (McCaughey and Ayers, 2003, page 60) Essentially, that is what they are, independent journalists with a view of reporting things in a democratically political style. Indeed, Italy's IMC has the motto "Don't hate the media, become the media". Perhaps the most globally-renowned independent news organisation, Al-Jazeera, prides itself on its independence, and it being one of only a handful of independent Middle-Eastern news organisations. It gained notoriety when it broadcast a video statement from Osama Bin-Laden following the 2001 September 11th terrorist atrocities.

    • Word count: 2083
  21. representation of ethnic minorities in eastender

    Hobson says (2003:210) 'Soap opera is the perfect genre to educate, inform and entertain.... educating it's audience about a myriad of issues...' she continues, (2003:107) ' it has a never ending narrative form, which enables it to respond to nuances of change in the lives of it's characters as they reflect changes in society.' Normally the characters are very stereotyped which Goodwin and Whannel explains are, '...characters who conform to patterns of behaviour that are easily recognized and understood.' (1990:134).

    • Word count: 1925
  22. Evaluate Corwin(TM)s claim that Metallicas One(TM) illustrates Descartes(TM) conception of the interaction between mind and body

    Descartes is known today as the 'Father of modern philosophy', (Robinson and Garret 1999:5) 'Most of the great scientific thinkers of the 17th century were Christian believers.' (Robinson, 1999:18). While seeking true knowledge, Descartes writes his Six Meditations. In these Meditations, Descartes tries to develop a strong foundation, which all knowledge can be built upon. Descartes was fascinated with the mind-body dualism. The song 'One' evoked the very idea of this. Metallica's 'One' song is from the soundtrack of the movie 'Johnny Got His Gun', (Irwin, 2007:174)

    • Word count: 1642
  23. digital media

    Printing is largely accepted as the innovation that brought the second major social shift (the first one being the transition from oral to scribal culture, meaning an important change in information transfer and the accuracy of the information passed on to others). It had certainly been identified long before, but it is only in 1970's and 80's that it was academically studied and maid the object of a book. The impact of the printing press was quite comprehensively studied by Elizabeth Eisenstein with a first publication in 1979, The Printing Press as an Agent of Change and the master volume

    • Word count: 2136
  24. new media

    Therefore, as Doctor Vinod Vidwans coordinator of New Media at National Institute of Design argues in his work New Media, The Approach Document, "new media may be defined as an innovative media that generated experiences using all the possible divergent media, expertise and emerging technologies." (New Media, An Approach Document, 2004) Because technologies are in a continuous and rapid progress, the users of new media must have diverse skills not only in new technologies or emerging technologies but also in all traditional media techniques.

    • Word count: 1780
  25. Does television still exist?

    These channels are allowed to show advertising for a limited period of time on every hour of broadcasting. The fact that all of the above terrestrial channels now all have multiple channels is an important point to note in the new age of television. In the United Kingdom there are also several cable and satellite television options available which give access to hundreds of non terrestrial channels. These include Freeview, Virgin Media, BT Vision and Sky. An important aspect of television which has changed over the past decade or so is the increase in subscription to non terrestrial television services such as those mentioned above.

    • Word count: 2059

Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?
  • Discuss the role of media studies in making sense of the political, economic and cultural meaning of everyday life.

    "To conclude, I have discussed on the role of media studies in making sense of the political, economic and cultural meaning of everyday life along with various effects media studies might have on both people and society. Indeed, people depend largely on media for information, images and entertainment of which they interpret and respond to their social environments. To a remarkable degree, we live in a media saturated milieu whereby our society is constituted by the media. Yet, there are consequences to consider when engaging in the study of media. Hence, it is vital to study the role of media studies in helping us to understand these aspects of society: political, economic and cultural in a comprehensive way."

  • Discuss the role of media studies in making sense of the political, economic and cultural meaning of everyday life

    "To conclude, I have discussed on the role of media studies in making sense of the political, economic and cultural meaning of everyday life along with various effects media studies might have on both people and society. Indeed, people depend largely on media for information, images and entertainment of which they interpret and respond to their social environments. To a remarkable degree, we live in a media saturated milieu whereby our society is constituted by the media. Yet, there are consequences to consider when engaging in the study of media. Hence, it is vital to study the role of media studies in helping us to understand these aspects of society: political, economic and cultural in a comprehensive way."

  • Depiction of ethnic minorities within a family context. I hope to analyse the depiction of several racial identities within a family context on two highly popular British soap operas, Eastenders on BBC1 and Coronation Street on ITV1.

    "After carefully analysing both soaps, I would say Eastenders provides more in terms of diversity in its community, there are definite central plots aimed at a different minorities and although there are still elements of stereotypes within it, the show does not fail to deliver interesting storylines that are not only centred around white characters but other ethnics also. I find Coronation Street lacking in the understanding of modern society and also of the setting in which the show is based on. There is very little attempt to incorporate ethnicity within the plots and when there is a reference, it is a general stereotype based on what the director deems to be real life. It is a shame that a highly popular soap opera like Coronation has been running for so long and still has not abandoned the way television was viewed years ago, but instead retains its predominate white cast and settles for a strict type of audience with little allocation for anyone else. Several small changes could see more ethnic audiences taking notice of the show, but until these changes are made, the show's creators will find that, myself included more and more minorities will be watching it's biggest competitor, Eastenders. Sources . Sunday Mirror 2002 ("

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