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Almond and Verba (1963) define three ideal types of political culture - parochial, subject and participant -

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Introduction

Almond and Verba (1963) define three ideal types of political culture - parochial, subject and participant - and argue that democracy is most stable under conditions of a predominant participant political culture mediated by elements of parochial and subject culture. Discuss this statement and illustrate your argument with reference to one or two democratic countries. "The political culture of a nation is the particular distribution of patterns of orientation towards political objects among the members of the nation." (Almond and Verba, 1963) The three types of political culture I am going to talk about are parochial, subject and participant. I will give a brief explanation of them with the help of "The Civic Culture" by Almond and Verba. ...read more.

Middle

An individual in this society expects nothing from the political system. In this type of culture, the specialised agencies of central government will hardly touch the consciousness of the villagers or tribesmen. In pure subject political culture, an individual does have knowledge of his/her political system and have feelings and opinions on it. An individual has no knowledge of the structure and roles, various political elites, and the policy proposals that are involves in the upward flow of policy making. He has no feelings and opinions of these structures, leaders and policy proposals. An individual does have knowledge of the downward flow of policy enforcement, the structures, individuals, and decisions involved in these processes. He has feelings and opinions on them. ...read more.

Conclusion

He has knowledge and feelings on the structure and roles of the political elites, and the policy proposals that are involved in the upward flow of policy making. He has knowledge and feelings on the downward flow of policy enforcement, the structures, individuals, and the decisions involved in these processes. He perceives himself as a member of his political system. He has knowledge of his rights, powers, obligations, and of strategies of access to influence. Members of this society tend to be explicitly oriented to the political system as a whole, and to political and administrative structures and processes. Individuals may like or dislike the various classes of political objects. They tend to be orientated towards an activist role of the self in the policy, through their feelings and evaluations of such a role may vary from acceptance to rejection. ...read more.

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