Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10
  11. 11
    11
  12. 12
    12
  13. 13
    13

Comparative policing systems

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Introduction Policing is not a recent issue in terms which duty of state as protecting both public and state still remains as a concept to focus on, yet, it is current enough to remember and to consider again. In this comparative study, policing systems of United Kingdom, Turkey and France will be controversially discussed in terms of policing related to its legitimacy, its structure, and its function. In the first section, the concepts of legitimacy, structure, and function will be defined. Afterwards, British policing system will be examined in terms of these three conceptions. Following British system, Turkish policing system which has been remarkably adapted to new policing concepts despite the fact that there are more to deal with will be following subject. Then, lastly, French system which has effectively been a model for some countries will be analyzed so as to understand 'The Continental Model'. After analyzing three countries, the similarities and differences between British and 'The Continental System' will be focused on, more particularly within a proposition that British Policing leads the way. Policing: Legitimacy, Structure, and Function Modern police was often seen as an instrument of progress, consistent with the idea of free enterprise, academic freedom, constitutional protection against arbitrary government (Liang, 2002, p: 4). Although there has been a common acceptance of policing recently, as Liang stated, there are different police systems all over the world. In order to be able to analyze and compare police systems, there are three terms by the help of which policing in different societies can be examined; legitimacy, structure, and function. ...read more.

Middle

Additionally, the national police force and the jandarma are different in terms of their respective jurisdictions and responsibilities vis-à-vis the civilian government authorities (Celador, Gemma Collantes et al 2008, p: 8). Jurisdiction of the police geographically differs from the jandarma's jurisdiction; the police provide security in urban areas rather whereas the jandarma are responsible for rural areas. In terms of structure, the police force is centralized, thus, compared to western central administration models, this structure is excessively central (Cerrah, 2005).In terms of function, there is obviously a higher number of the jandarma compared to the police, although urban areas contain more population than rural areas. There are some 193,000 police whereas the jandarma are between 280,000 and 300,000 (Mercedes and Newburn, 2008). According to Mercedes and Newburn's study which is one of the last studies about Turkey and policing system, number of the jandarma is highly more than the police's. There are several reasons but, eventually, as a result of disproportional allocation, the priority is not welfare but the continuity of order in terms of administrative and political tasks in addition to crime prevention. Last of all, in terms of legitimacy, police legitimacy derives from law rather than public. After legislation through the EU twinning projects, for example with amendments and modifications on Law on Powers and Tasks of Police (1936), the government has aimed at changing consideration of police as a 'service' rather than 'power'. Nevertheless, in practice, this is not easily possible. ...read more.

Conclusion

There several attempts contrast to thought because of which the Met was established. Furthermore, during the 70s the developments in police riot brought the English police closer in their riot tactics and equipments, yet, unlike continental neighbours, employers were not specialized riot squads (Emsley, 1991). Finally, the men, responsible for creation the English police during the 19th century, wanted to restrict the political and military nature of the new police, but Emsley states that despite these reasons of creation of English police, the economic, political and social nature of Victorian England was instrumental in helping some people to achieve their aim (1991). By contrast with whom see centralized system as incorporating problems of non-accountability and partisanship, Mawby critically examines this idea. Firstly, one should not assume that locally, community-oriented systems are necessarily panaceas; they may incorporate problems of non-accountability, elite control and partisanship. Secondly, however, although political policing has been more a future of policing systems in countries where the police are militaristic, there is no clear relationship between the presence of one, central police system and these features. Nor is a central system necessarily incompatible with local accountability. Last of all, as illustrated in his study, the presence of absence of a single, centralized police is no more evidence of a 'police state' than is the presence or absence of the jury system (Mawby, 1992, p: 125-126). Today, in terms of function, structure, and legitimacy, community-oriented systems are seen more advantageous, but privacy and liberty of individuals are threatened by the surveillance, bugging and file-keeping methods of modern police (Manwaring-White, 1993). ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our University Degree Criminology section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related University Degree Criminology essays

  1. Discuss the different academic responses to contemporary criticisms of the old police. How helpful ...

    Law enforcement was not only left to the constables but to the âwatchmenâ as well. âNight watchmen patrolled the streets between 9 or 10 pm until sunrise, and were expected to examine all suspicious charactersâ (Emsley, C , Hitchcock, T and Shoemaker, R 2011).

  2. What are the aims of the Youth Justice System in England and Wales. How ...

    The AC (2004) discovered that magistrates largely appear to be very satisfied with the services provided by Yots and eight out of ten Yot managers find the YJB's role helpful, a rarity in relations between local and central government. The YJB monitors the performance of Yots against 13 performance measures.

  1. Does the Police and Evidence Act 1984 (PACE) and its codes of practice successfully ...

    The police officer have the right to seize and retain everything what he believes may be used by suspect as a tool to make injury to himself or other people, or what could be an evidence against him. The constable may also ask the suspect to remove his jacket and

  2. Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of youth justice policies in England and Wales since ...

    Also detention and training orders, these will give powers the Home Office (1997) states can be used for 10-17 year olds and courts can use these only if it is a very serious crime and if they are persistent offenders and the court believes it is needed to protect the public.

  1. What do you understand by the terms prejudice and discrimination and stereotyping? Discuss ...

    There are caveats in very limited circumstances. For example, different terms of employment can be legal based on marital status, and a genuine occupational requirement can be imposed if absolutely necessary (Sex Discrimination Act 1975, section 7). Indirect discrimination is when an individual is subjected to a particular provision, criteria

  2. EXAMINE THE IMPLICATIONS OF WAR ON TERROR ON HUMAN RIGHTS AND PRIVACY IN EUROPE

    Daniel Moeckli (2008) proposed issues to evaluate the liberty and security report which he suggested are based on language of balance, questioning their effectiveness regarding the contemporary anti terrorism measures. He criticized the so called liberty and security agenda that it is unequally distributed and discriminatory to minority's human rights.

  1. Critically Assess community policing as a model of police service delivery

    As I look into each component I will look at the positive and negatives aspects of each, before ending with a conclusion on community policing as a model of police service delivery. Imagine the picture, we have all seen some kind of television program that depicts a lone 'Bobby' working

  2. The Aim of Criminology is to Speak Truth to Power

    context of neo-liberalism and the extent to which it impinges on the production of criminological knowledge. Although criminological teaching began to expand in the 1930's, it was not until the 1950's that criminology began to gather momentum. The government imperative in the 1950's began to actively support university based research.

  • Over 180,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work

Marked by a teacher

This essay has been marked by one of our great teachers. You can read the full teachers notes when you download the essay.

Peer reviewed

This essay has been reviewed by one of our specialist student essay reviewing squad. Read the full review on the essay page.

Peer reviewed

This essay has been reviewed by one of our specialist student essay reviewing squad. Read the full review under the essay preview on this page.