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George Washington: Indispensable

Extracts from this essay...

Introduction

Erik Cronkrite George Washington: Indispensable Indispensable a word meaning absolutely necessary1, is significant when analyzing the Presidency of George Washington a man whom James T. Flexner described as "the indispensable man." Being described indispensable can have lofty very expectations. People might say that this was a great compliment and others might say a statement that says one's indispensability lends itself to be scrutinized by critics. Boldly stating George Washington was absolutely necessary, essential, and irreplaceable, James Flexner proposed an interesting question: Could the young republic of the United States have survived with similar success had Washington not been the original executor? This essay will analyze the political significance of George Washington as the first American President by mentioning two important accomplishments and failures throughout his Presidency using the biography Patriarch: George Washington and the New American Nation by Robert Norton Smith as the backbone of historical information. The argument that Washington was indispensable, must be shown by providing arguments that prove that nobody else could have taken his place at the time. The Patriarch: George Washington and the New American Nation leans towards two possible political figures that could have replaced Washington at the time. These two figures, Jefferson and Hamilton, were ironically part of Washington's cabinet and during this time period considered the two next most influential political figures.

Middle

The Whiskey Rebellion was a series of protests in western Pennsylvania against the federal law of 1792 which was imposing a tax on whisky.7 The idea of a tax was supported by federalists, such as Hamilton, but felt heavy opposition from the likes of grain farmers, who depended on whisky as major source of income. The reason that this was one of George Washington's failures as a president was because of the fact that the public felt an injustice to their rights. "Washington feared the whisky rebels and the leveling impulse they represented. He was only human. He had spent a lifetime climbing the social ladder of respectability, sacrificing personal serenity and physical comfort to win a brutal war and found a nation."8 Washington issued a proclamation in 1794, which ordered the use military force in organized resistance situations. "Washington regarded himself as the surest interpreter of the Constitution to which he had given sanction and in whose defense he was now prepared to risk bloodshed."9 The Whisky Rebellion in the end was a failure but important in Washington's Presidency, because it was the first real test for the federal government and the power to enforce law, most notable the Presidential right to command the use of military force from the Constitution.

Conclusion

But Washington felt the need to have the Treaty approved because of the possibility of war on rise. In the end the country has survived to be the most powerful and influential country in the world today, but without Washington setting standards and forming a model to follow where would our country be? Notes 1. "Indespensible." Webster's New World Compact School and Office Dictionary. Updated ed. New York: MacMillian, 1995. 220. 2. Smith, Robert Norton. Patriarch: George Washington and the New American Government. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1992. 12. 3. Smith, Robert Norton. Patriarch: George Washington and the New American Government. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1992. 8. 4. Smith, Robert Norton. Patriarch: George Washington and the New American Government. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1992. 50. 5. Smith, Robert Norton. Patriarch: George Washington and the New American Government. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1992. 161. 6. Smith, Robert Norton. Patriarch: George Washington and the New American Government. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1992. 161. 7. Smith, Robert Norton. Patriarch: George Washington and the New American Government. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1992. 210. 8. Smith, Robert Norton. Patriarch: George Washington and the New American Government. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1992. 215. 9. Smith, Robert Norton. Patriarch: George Washington and the New American Government. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1992. 215. 10. Smith, Robert Norton. Patriarch: George Washington and the New American Government. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1992. 232. 1

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